Space!

Fed up talking videogames? Why?
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Qikz
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PostRe: Space!
by Qikz » Sun Feb 19, 2017 10:33 pm

Tragic Magic wrote:Just ignore it and move on. I was wasted and dribbling gooseberry fool from my fingertips.


Did you at least put it on a biscuit to give to your brother again?

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The Watching Artist wrote:I feel so inept next to Stay Dead...
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OrangeRakoon
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PostRe: Space!
by OrangeRakoon » Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:07 am

SpaceX are incredible

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Saint of Killers
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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:10 am

Milky Way’s loner status is upheld - Galaxy’s location in a vast cosmic void could help explain dueling universe expansion rates

If the Milky Way exists in the biggest cosmic void ever observed, that could solve a puzzling mismatch between ways to measure how fast the universe is expanding.

Observations of 120,000 galaxies bolstering the Milky Way’s loner status were presented by Benjamin Hoscheit June 7 at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas. Building on earlier work by his adviser, University of Wisconsin‒Madison astronomer Amy Barger, Hoscheit and Barger measured how the density of galaxies changed with distance from the Milky Way.

In agreement with the earlier study, the pair found that the Milky Way has far fewer neighbors than it should. There was a rise in density about 1 billion light-years out, suggesting the Milky Way resides in an abyss about 2 billion light-years wide.

Simulations of how cosmic structures form suggest that most galaxies clump along dense filaments of dark matter, which are separated by vast cosmic voids.

If the Milky Way lives in such a void, it could help explain why the universe seems to be expanding at different rates depending on how it’s measured (SN: 8/6/16, p. 10). Measurements based on the cosmic microwave background, the earliest light in the universe, suggest one rate of expansion, while measurements of nearby supernovas suggest a faster one.

Those supernovas could be feeling an extra gravitational pull from all the matter at the edges of the void, Hoscheit says. The actual expansion rate is probably the slower one measured in the universe’s early light.

“If you don’t account for the void effects, you could mistake this relationship to indicate that there is too much expansion,” Hoscheit says.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/mil ... tus-upheld


So... does this mean that whole thing about one day humans will look up only to be greeted with an empty sky bit isn't true? (Or it is but only for us shmucks in the MW galaxy.) Or is this in regards to something else?

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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OrangeRakoon
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PostRe: Space!
by OrangeRakoon » Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:43 am

Saint of Killers wrote:So... does this mean that whole thing about one day humans will look up only to be greeted with an empty sky bit isn't true?


I don't know what you mean by this?

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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:56 am

OrangeRakoon wrote:
Saint of Killers wrote:So... does this mean that whole thing about one day humans will look up only to be greeted with an empty sky bit isn't true?


I don't know what you mean by this?


It's something I've heard over the years on Horizon, about how space is expanding between celestial bodies/galaxies. If it's only increasing between galaxies then I guess stars/planets in the MW would remain visible...

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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PostRe: Space!
by OrangeRakoon » Wed Jun 21, 2017 11:31 am

The above is basically an explanation for a discrepancy between two methods of measurement of how fast the universe is expanding, but I don't think it has wider implications that drastically change the future evolution of the universe or our view of it. The universe still appears to be expanding at an increasing rate, which I think is what Horizon has probably spoken about before.

In a forever expanding universe (which appears to be what we live in), galaxies outside of our local cluster continuously get further away (for those in our local cluster gravity outweighs the expansion so we remain close/gravitationally bound). This means that all distant galaxies fade in the sky and then eventually become undetectable altogether. Locally the sky would still be full of stars in our galaxy (remember that all individual stars we see in the sky are in the milky way) and we would still be able to observe galaxies in our local cluster. However star formation itself will also eventually cease once the supply of gas is exhausted, so slowly yes all the lights will go out and we'll be left with a cold, star-less sky.

So there are two different general mechanisms at work there, but yes no change to the eventual heat death of the universe unfortunately.

I wait to be corrected on the above

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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Wed Jun 21, 2017 7:32 pm

OrangeRakoon wrote:The above is basically an explanation for a discrepancy between two methods of measurement of how fast the universe is expanding, but I don't think it has wider implications that drastically change the future evolution of the universe or our view of it. The universe still appears to be expanding at an increasing rate, which I think is what Horizon has probably spoken about before.

In a forever expanding universe (which appears to be what we live in), galaxies outside of our local cluster continuously get further away (for those in our local cluster gravity outweighs the expansion so we remain close/gravitationally bound). This means that all distant galaxies fade in the sky and then eventually become undetectable altogether. Locally the sky would still be full of stars in our galaxy (remember that all individual stars we see in the sky are in the milky way) and we would still be able to observe galaxies in our local cluster. However star formation itself will also eventually cease once the supply of gas is exhausted, so slowly yes all the lights will go out and we'll be left with a cold, star-less sky.

So there are two different general mechanisms at work there, but yes no change to the eventual heat death of the universe unfortunately.

I wait to be corrected on the above


Why does hearing that always make me so sad :(

Ta for making me feel sad taking the time to explain that :wub:

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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Peter Crisp
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PostRe: Space!
by Peter Crisp » Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:51 pm

Here's a great site that talks about space and the presenter responded to my questions :wub: .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehHyWCLSm30&t=23s

jiggles wrote:Nobody with a VR headset is going to be using it regularly this time next year, let alone in 4 years time.


Posted 16th March 2016. Let's see.
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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Sat Jul 22, 2017 6:00 am

Jupiter has two new moons

And five lost ones have been found.


http://www.astronomy.com/news/2017/06/j ... -new-moons

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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PostRe: Space!
by Lagamorph » Sat Jul 22, 2017 7:31 am

How do you lose a moon?

Lagamorph's Underwater Photography Thread
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Turboman wrote:Lagomorph..... Is ..... Right
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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Sat Jul 22, 2017 7:41 am

I don't know, how do you lose a moon?

But seriously, this is how:

Several of the moons Sheppard’s team found qualify as lost moons - despite their discovery back in 2003, there was not enough information to define their exact orbits, so astronomers lost track of them as they circled Jupiter. Some moons have been found since that time, but at the beginning of 2016, 14 were still considered lost.


Bunch of slackers.

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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PostRe: Space!
by Moggy » Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:09 am

Lagamorph wrote:How do you lose a moon?


Jupiter is the McCann of planets.

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Saint of Killers
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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:51 pm

Alien search detects radio signals from dwarf galaxy 3bn light years from Earth

Stephen Hawking’s Breakthrough Listen project picks up radio pulses that could be from black holes, neutron stars or, some speculate – UFO beacons

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... from-earth

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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Moggy
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PostRe: Space!
by Moggy » Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:52 pm

Saint of Killers wrote:
Alien search detects radio signals from dwarf galaxy 3bn light years from Earth

Stephen Hawking’s Breakthrough Listen project picks up radio pulses that could be from black holes, neutron stars or, some speculate – UFO beacons

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... from-earth


We're all going to die. :cry:

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Preezy
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PostRe: Space!
by Preezy » Fri Sep 01, 2017 10:48 pm

Finally concrete evidence that we're not alone. I'M READY FELLAS, COME AND GET ME!

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PostRe: Space!
by Ad7 » Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:12 pm

Oh god I hope they bring back Elvis!

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Saint of Killers
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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:18 pm

Half the universe’s missing matter has just been finally found

...

Two separate teams found the missing matter – made of particles called baryons rather than dark matter – linking galaxies together through filaments of hot, diffuse gas.

“The missing baryon problem is solved,” says Hideki Tanimura at the Institute of Space Astrophysics in Orsay, France, leader of one of the groups. The other team was led by Anna de Graaff at the University of Edinburgh, UK.

Because the gas is so tenuous and not quite hot enough for X-ray telescopes to pick up, nobody had been able to see it before.

“There’s no sweet spot – no sweet instrument that we’ve invented yet that can directly observe this gas,” says Richard Ellis at University College London. “It’s been purely speculation until now.”

So the two groups had to find another way to definitively show that these threads of gas are really there.

Both teams took advantage of a phenomenon called the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect that occurs when light left over from the big bang passes through hot gas. As the light travels, some of it scatters off the electrons in the gas, leaving a dim patch in the cosmic microwave background – our snapshot of the remnants from the birth of the cosmos.

...

https://www.newscientist.com/article/21 ... lly-found/

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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PostRe: Space!
by Xeno » Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:58 pm

I'm glad we have found that 2.5%, now we can try to work out the other 95%.

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Rightey
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PostRe: Space!
by Rightey » Mon Oct 09, 2017 10:25 pm

Saint of Killers wrote:
Alien search detects radio signals from dwarf galaxy 3bn light years from Earth

Stephen Hawking’s Breakthrough Listen project picks up radio pulses that could be from black holes, neutron stars or, some speculate – UFO beacons

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... from-earth


3 Billion Light Years away and I can barely pick up a radio station 80km away :x

Pelloki on ghosts wrote:Just start masturbating furiously. That'll make them go away.

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