Space!

Fed up talking videogames? Why?
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Partridge Iciclebubbles
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PostRe: Space!
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Mon Apr 11, 2016 1:01 pm

Alvin Flummux wrote:Elon Musk shared this little gem:



Brilliant. :lol:

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floydfreak
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PostRe: Space!
by floydfreak » Sun Apr 17, 2016 11:55 pm


Poncho wrote:
BobbyDigital wrote:I wanna move out of the UK (to L.A. or somewhere similar in the USA) but don't know how to really.


A plane, Bobby. It's like a big metal bird.
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Rightey
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PostRe: Space!
by Rightey » Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:03 am

So is has there been any updates on that weird star that was found last year that might be an alien superstructure?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 93886.html

Pelloki on ghosts wrote:Just start masturbating furiously. That'll make them go away.

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floydfreak
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PostRe: Space!
by floydfreak » Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:01 pm


Poncho wrote:
BobbyDigital wrote:I wanna move out of the UK (to L.A. or somewhere similar in the USA) but don't know how to really.


A plane, Bobby. It's like a big metal bird.
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Preezy
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PostRe: Space!
by Preezy » Wed Apr 20, 2016 9:10 am

Rightey wrote:So is has there been any updates on that weird star that was found last year that might be an alien superstructure?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 93886.html

Yeah it was confirmed as an alien megastructure and we've already sent Matt Damon to check it out, don't you watch the news?

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Gandalf
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PostRe: Space!
by Gandalf » Wed Apr 20, 2016 1:52 pm

http://news.sky.com/video/1681974/stunning-northern-lights-from-iss

Awesome footage of the 'Northern Lights' from the ISS

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OrangeReindeer
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PostRe: Space!
by OrangeReindeer » Wed Apr 20, 2016 4:04 pm

floydfreak wrote:


Genuinely can't tell if this is a subtle parody or just bad

"Nature fights this inevitable disintegration by constantly reassembling matter and energy into lower states of entropy in cycles of death and rebirth." :dread:

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Captain Kinopio
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PostRe: Space!
by Captain Kinopio » Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:08 pm

Interesting program about the Fermi Paradox and Aliens on BBC4 at the moment

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Captain Kinopio
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PostRe: Space!
by Captain Kinopio » Mon May 09, 2016 11:05 pm

Anyone know where might be a good place to find good quality photos of Mercury passing in front of the sun yesterday?

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floydfreak
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PostRe: Space!
by floydfreak » Tue May 10, 2016 9:28 pm

NASA's Kepler Mission Announces Largest Collection of Planets Ever Discovered

NASA's Kepler mission has verified 1,284 new planets – the single largest finding of planets to date.

“This announcement more than doubles the number of confirmed planets from Kepler,” said Ellen Stofan, chief scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “This gives us hope that somewhere out there, around a star much like ours, we can eventually discover another Earth.”

Analysis was performed on the Kepler space telescope’s July 2015 planet candidate catalog, which identified 4,302 potential planets. For 1,284 of the candidates, the probability of being a planet is greater than 99 percent – the minimum required to earn the status of “planet.” An additional 1,327 candidates are more likely than not to be actual planets, but they do not meet the 99 percent threshold and will require additional study. The remaining 707 are more likely to be some other astrophysical phenomena. This analysis also validated 984 candidates previously verified by other techniques.

"Before the Kepler space telescope launched, we did not know whether exoplanets were rare or common in the galaxy. Thanks to Kepler and the research community, we now know there could be more planets than stars,” said Paul Hertz, Astrophysics Division director at NASA Headquarters. "This knowledge informs the future missions that are needed to take us ever-closer to finding out whether we are alone in the universe."

Kepler captures the discrete signals of distant planets – decreases in brightness that occur when planets pass in front of, or transit, their stars – much like the May 9 Mercury transit of our sun. Since the discovery of the first planets outside our solar system more than two decades ago, researchers have resorted to a laborious, one-by-one process of verifying suspected planets.

This latest announcement, however, is based on a statistical analysis method that can be applied to many planet candidates simultaneously. Timothy Morton, associate research scholar at Princeton University in New Jersey and lead author of the scientific paper published in The Astrophysical Journal, employed a technique to assign each Kepler candidate a planet-hood probability percentage – the first such automated computation on this scale, as previous statistical techniques focused only on sub-groups within the greater list of planet candidates identified by Kepler.

"Planet candidates can be thought of like bread crumbs,” said Morton. “If you drop a few large crumbs on the floor, you can pick them up one by one. But, if you spill a whole bag of tiny crumbs, you're going to need a broom. This statistical analysis is our broom."

In the newly-validated batch of planets, nearly 550 could be rocky planets like Earth, based on their size. Nine of these orbit in their sun's habitable zone, which is the distance from a star where orbiting planets can have surface temperatures that allow liquid water to pool. With the addition of these nine, 21 exoplanets now are known to be members of this exclusive group.

"They say not to count our chickens before they're hatched, but that's exactly what these results allow us to do based on probabilities that each egg (candidate) will hatch into a chick (bona fide planet)," said Natalie Batalha, co-author of the paper and the Kepler mission scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. “This work will help Kepler reach its full potential by yielding a deeper understanding of the number of stars that harbor potentially habitable, Earth-size planets -- a number that's needed to design future missions to search for habitable environments and living worlds.”

Of the nearly 5,000 total planet candidates found to date, more than 3,200 now have been verified, and 2,325 of these were discovered by Kepler. Launched in March 2009, Kepler is the first NASA mission to find potentially habitable Earth-size planets. For four years, Kepler monitored 150,000 stars in a single patch of sky, measuring the tiny, telltale dip in the brightness of a star that can be produced by a transiting planet. In 2018, NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will use the same method to monitor 200,000 bright nearby stars and search for planets, focusing on Earth and Super-Earth-sized.

Ames manages the Kepler missions for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation operates the flight system, with support from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

For more information about the Kepler mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/kepler

http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasas ... discovered

Poncho wrote:
BobbyDigital wrote:I wanna move out of the UK (to L.A. or somewhere similar in the USA) but don't know how to really.


A plane, Bobby. It's like a big metal bird.
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Lastpostamorph
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PostRe: Space!
by Lastpostamorph » Mon Sep 26, 2016 1:01 am


Lagamorph's Underwater Photography Thread
Zellery wrote:Good post Lagamorph.
Turboman wrote:Lagomorph..... Is ..... Right
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Alvin Flummux
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PostRe: Space!
by Alvin Flummux » Mon Sep 26, 2016 1:02 am

Ah, must be time to drum up support for more funding again.

Jupiter is in your sun sign this week, making it pretty crowded in there, what with Jupiter being the largest of the planets and all.
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Saint of Killers
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PostRe: Space!
by Saint of Killers » Fri Oct 14, 2016 9:52 am

We may be *even more* insignificant than we thought!

The Universe Contains 10 to 20 Times More Galaxies Than We Thought

A new study suggests there are at least two trillion galaxies in the universe, and 90 percent are hidden from view.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/a ... -galaxies/


:toot:

| (•_•)| S: This is the best date I've been on since my last date. PB: This is not a date.
S: Neither was the last one. It was a robbery. M: Really? S: Yeah. She stole my heart. And my crown. (❍ᴥ❍ʋ)
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Preezy
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PostRe: Space!
by Preezy » Fri Oct 14, 2016 1:28 pm

We're even more insignificant than first thought, how humbling.

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Tell Karl his brother is dead
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PostRe: Space!
by Tell Karl his brother is dead » Fri Oct 14, 2016 1:53 pm

Get rekt tiny humans.

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lex-man
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PostRe: Space!
by lex-man » Sat Oct 15, 2016 11:15 pm

Preezy wrote:
Rightey wrote:So is has there been any updates on that weird star that was found last year that might be an alien superstructure?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 93886.html

Yeah it was confirmed as an alien megastructure and we've already sent Matt Damon to check it out, don't you watch the news?


Ugh, how much are we going to have to pay to save him this time?

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Tragic Magic
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PostRe: Space!
by Tragic Magic » Sun Oct 16, 2016 2:40 am

If someone could put a little rocket on your penis and shoot it into space, would that be a good idea? I don't want to stray from serious discussion and I apologise but I received this offer at the pub tonight and was thinking about the potential consequences.

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Somebody Else's Presents
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PostRe: Space!
by Somebody Else's Presents » Sun Oct 16, 2016 9:15 am

Tragic Magic wrote:If someone could put a little rocket on your penis and shoot it into space, would that be a good idea? I don't want to stray from serious discussion and I apologise but I received this offer at the pub tonight and was thinking about the potential consequences.


Is this your brother being weird again?

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Tragic Magic
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PostRe: Space!
by Tragic Magic » Sun Oct 16, 2016 11:24 am

Just ignore it and move on. I was wasted and dribbling gooseberry fool from my fingertips.

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Partridge Iciclebubbles
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PostRe: Space!
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:52 pm

This looks like the footage has been reversed but is actually a SpaceX rocket landing. :wub:


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