Cycling

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Jul 24, 2018 1:31 pm

Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
KjGarly wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Have you considered panniers? I carry a fair bit to and from work and im sure the bastard uphill ride home would be a lot more uncomfortable with a backpack.

I haven't but it does sound like a good idea as I've got a laptop and change of clothes etc. to lug back and forth.


I've got 2 of these, theyre excellent. Large capacity, waterproof. Clip on and off the rack with handles.

https://www.outdoorgb.com/p/OverBoard_W ... e_Pannier/


Shall have a look into it, would need to get the actual mounts for my bike, only other bugger is the bike is the bike is a mountain type bike so worry it will look a bit daft on it.

One of these:

Image

I'm fine with riding it for work, its more effort but once I get into he swing of it it wont be so bad, and if I can get into it all I plan on getting a new commuter via the cycle to work scheme at work as a sort of "well done"


Just switch out the tyres for road ones and you'll feel a big difference in the ride if yours has chunky mountain bike tyres.


I considered that, but a good chunk of the ride in is on a "cycle path" that is loose surface so the bigger tyres are a blessing for that.


You can get some some pretty decent MTB tyres these days that will still handle a looser surface whilst giving you gains on roads as well. It really does make things much easier compared to the oversized tyres that a lot of mountain bikes come with.


I shall look into it, need to hope I can re0attache the pedal arm thing and it not be more than just the bolt coming loose over time first.

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Jenuall
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PostRe: Cycling
by Jenuall » Tue Jul 24, 2018 1:39 pm

Errkal wrote:
Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
KjGarly wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Have you considered panniers? I carry a fair bit to and from work and im sure the bastard uphill ride home would be a lot more uncomfortable with a backpack.

I haven't but it does sound like a good idea as I've got a laptop and change of clothes etc. to lug back and forth.


I've got 2 of these, theyre excellent. Large capacity, waterproof. Clip on and off the rack with handles.

https://www.outdoorgb.com/p/OverBoard_W ... e_Pannier/


Shall have a look into it, would need to get the actual mounts for my bike, only other bugger is the bike is the bike is a mountain type bike so worry it will look a bit daft on it.

One of these:

Image

I'm fine with riding it for work, its more effort but once I get into he swing of it it wont be so bad, and if I can get into it all I plan on getting a new commuter via the cycle to work scheme at work as a sort of "well done"


Just switch out the tyres for road ones and you'll feel a big difference in the ride if yours has chunky mountain bike tyres.


I considered that, but a good chunk of the ride in is on a "cycle path" that is loose surface so the bigger tyres are a blessing for that.


You can get some some pretty decent MTB tyres these days that will still handle a looser surface whilst giving you gains on roads as well. It really does make things much easier compared to the oversized tyres that a lot of mountain bikes come with.


I shall look into it, need to hope I can re0attache the pedal arm thing and it not be more than just the bolt coming loose over time first.


Cool. If it's just the crank arm that needs replacing/re-attaching then that shouldn't be too tricky, but if you need to service or replace the bottom bracket then that's a bit of a bigger job that may need some more specialist tools.

One of the best things about bikes is that pretty much everything in terms of maintenance falls under the DIY category, if you can get a few tools and watch the right YouTube tutorial then you can probably fix or replace anything!

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Jul 24, 2018 2:26 pm

Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
KjGarly wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Have you considered panniers? I carry a fair bit to and from work and im sure the bastard uphill ride home would be a lot more uncomfortable with a backpack.

I haven't but it does sound like a good idea as I've got a laptop and change of clothes etc. to lug back and forth.


I've got 2 of these, theyre excellent. Large capacity, waterproof. Clip on and off the rack with handles.

https://www.outdoorgb.com/p/OverBoard_W ... e_Pannier/


Shall have a look into it, would need to get the actual mounts for my bike, only other bugger is the bike is the bike is a mountain type bike so worry it will look a bit daft on it.

One of these:

Image

I'm fine with riding it for work, its more effort but once I get into he swing of it it wont be so bad, and if I can get into it all I plan on getting a new commuter via the cycle to work scheme at work as a sort of "well done"


Just switch out the tyres for road ones and you'll feel a big difference in the ride if yours has chunky mountain bike tyres.


I considered that, but a good chunk of the ride in is on a "cycle path" that is loose surface so the bigger tyres are a blessing for that.


You can get some some pretty decent MTB tyres these days that will still handle a looser surface whilst giving you gains on roads as well. It really does make things much easier compared to the oversized tyres that a lot of mountain bikes come with.


I shall look into it, need to hope I can re0attache the pedal arm thing and it not be more than just the bolt coming loose over time first.


Cool. If it's just the crank arm that needs replacing/re-attaching then that shouldn't be too tricky, but if you need to service or replace the bottom bracket then that's a bit of a bigger job that may need some more specialist tools.

One of the best things about bikes is that pretty much everything in terms of maintenance falls under the DIY category, if you can get a few tools and watch the right YouTube tutorial then you can probably fix or replace anything!


Just had a look over lunch as I left it work and there doesn't seem any actual wear on the bracket, its a octalink one and everything seems nice and square so seems that the bolt has just worked loose over time and the ride in yesterday it went from tight enough to hold the arm to off which I guess is good as it means it didn't spend some time wobbling doing damage.

Anyways, I've done it up as best i can with an allen key (I dont have a torque wrench set to do it with that) so will have to keep an eye on it and order a torque set when I have the money.

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:27 pm

Made and omg the sweat.

Bolt stayed tight the whole way even with a lot of hills, got home and was still unable to turn it so yay for now at least it is OK. Going to keep the Alan key in my bag mind you and check it after each ride to be sure as until I can do it properly it can easily loosen again

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Thu Aug 02, 2018 8:16 am

First day riding this week as I hurt my foot last week in my sleep. Made it without busting the bike :D

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Ad7
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PostRe: Cycling
by Ad7 » Mon Sep 03, 2018 6:15 pm

Aaaaand I got a puncture on the way home. :x

Had a couple of hours free tonight, was really looking forward to playing a game but noooooo ive now got a full evening of strawberry floating around fixing this gooseberry fool.

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darksideby182
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PostRe: Cycling
by darksideby182 » Mon Sep 03, 2018 9:00 pm

Should only take 15 minutes from start to finish.

Or even quicker have a spare inner tube to put in (remembering to check the tyre) and you can repair the used inner tube whenever.

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PostRe: Cycling
by Ad7 » Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:33 pm

I bought a new inner tube in the end, it was only £7 for a decent branded one. I showed the guy my bike on the shop floor (I got it there, this was a demo one), And he explained how the thin valves on them work (the end unscrews to open the valve). Now I know the one at the rear has always been open because the moment the pump goes on, air is hissing all over the shop. Also I noticed when I pumped the tyre when I had to stop that the screw on cap made the air come out if you did it up fully. I suspect it's been open the whole time and compression on the rear is pushing it against the cap. Anyway I gave the current tyre a bloody good inflate and it seemed to take the pressure properly, so it may have just been slowly letting air out rather than being a slow puncture. I'll see in the morning, if it's down again I'll change it tomorrow evening.

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:37 am

strawberry floating hate those valves.

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Ad7
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PostRe: Cycling
by Ad7 » Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:50 am

Yeah it really doesn't seem robust enough to be holding all that pressure in.

Tyre is still fully inflated, so I'm going to risk it this morning.

Rip in peace me

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Sep 04, 2018 10:30 am

Ad7 wrote:Yeah it really doesn't seem robust enough to be holding all that pressure in.

Tyre is still fully inflated, so I'm going to risk it this morning.

Rip in peace me


The pins can bend easily too they are just hateful things. At the point when people make times where that valve bit is changeable you know you don't have a strong enough valve!

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Jenuall
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PostRe: Cycling
by Jenuall » Thu Sep 06, 2018 9:30 am

Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Yeah it really doesn't seem robust enough to be holding all that pressure in.

Tyre is still fully inflated, so I'm going to risk it this morning.

Rip in peace me


The pins can bend easily too they are just hateful things. At the point when people make times where that valve bit is changeable you know you don't have a strong enough valve!


Presta valves? I've never had any issues with them myself and they're much easier to pump up than the fatter Schrader ones. If you keep the valve screwed shut with a cap on top I don't see the problem with them?

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Ad7
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PostRe: Cycling
by Ad7 » Thu Sep 06, 2018 10:17 am

The valve wasn't screwed shut as the person who set the bike up left it that way. That's also not a question.

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Thu Sep 06, 2018 11:07 am

I just find them damn fiddly and annoying.

Much Much prefer the car style valve

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Jenuall
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PostRe: Cycling
by Jenuall » Thu Sep 06, 2018 11:52 am

Ad7 wrote:The valve wasn't screwed shut as the person who set the bike up left it that way.

Fair enough, I guess the schrader valves do have the advantage that you can't leave them in a position that could have this problem. Sounds like the person who set up the bike should have been a bit more careful!

The schrader valves being thicker does limit their usefulness though - you can't have thin wheels (and therefore tyres) with them as the metal would be too weak with the larger hole.

Ad7 wrote:That's also not a question.

But I put a question mark at then end so that makes it a question.

That's how things work? ;)

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PostRe: Cycling
by Ad7 » Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:55 am

Jesus strawberry floating Christ I hate people.

My cycle to work is becoming a strawberry floating joke. The cycle path is busier and busier with mums waking their spawn to a tinder meet or something. I'm dressed head to toe in hi vis gear, I ring my bike bell in good time and say excuse me and still I get looked at like I run the Jimmy savillle fan club or something. I had to stop completely 4 times because people just let their kids walk right in front of me (And facing me with me ringing the bell and saying, "excuse me") and then one woman in a tunnel walking right in the middle of the path who didn't move shouted "excuse ME!" at me because I had to go between her and the wall. I'll hit the bitch with one of my paniers if she does it again tomorrow.

banana splits the lot of them.

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Jenuall
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PostRe: Cycling
by Jenuall » Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:09 am

Cycle path? Psycho-path more like! :slol:

That does sounds like a bit of a nightmare, my cycling commute has always been on roads where, yes cars can often be dicks, for the most part you don't get this kind of obstruction all the time. I think I would have murdered a few people if I had to contend with that every day!

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PostRe: Cycling
by Ad7 » Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:41 pm

Looking at getting 'The world's loudest cycle horn'

At 140dB its equivalent to a jet engine and 4 x louder than the competition. Now cyclists can actively alert lorries buses cars and pedestrians to their presence (rather than hoping to be seen) which makes cycling safer.
•Piercing 140 decibel sound
•2 modes including quieter Park mode


:nod:

There will 3 phases to passing someone.
1. I use the normal bell as usual
2. I approach using the bell politely saying excuse me as normal
3. I then use this strawberry floater and give them ptsd Vietnam flashbacks

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Jenuall
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PostRe: Cycling
by Jenuall » Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:44 pm

Nice!

I had something similar but in terms of lighting, a monster of a light which had a relatively short battery life but was significantly brighter than anything else on the road, including most car headlights! If anyone was being a dick and not giving me enough space then I could basically blind them with my beast of a light. :datass:

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PostRe: Cycling
by Ad7 » Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:53 pm

:lol:

Speaking of lights, I need to get some for mine as it's slowly getting to that point. Anyone got any recommendations? Ideally I'd like to light the whole path up in front rather than just have one to draw attention.


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