Cycling

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Errkal
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Jul 24, 2018 1:31 pm

Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
KjGarly wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Have you considered panniers? I carry a fair bit to and from work and im sure the bastard uphill ride home would be a lot more uncomfortable with a backpack.

I haven't but it does sound like a good idea as I've got a laptop and change of clothes etc. to lug back and forth.


I've got 2 of these, theyre excellent. Large capacity, waterproof. Clip on and off the rack with handles.

https://www.outdoorgb.com/p/OverBoard_W ... e_Pannier/


Shall have a look into it, would need to get the actual mounts for my bike, only other bugger is the bike is the bike is a mountain type bike so worry it will look a bit daft on it.

One of these:

Image

I'm fine with riding it for work, its more effort but once I get into he swing of it it wont be so bad, and if I can get into it all I plan on getting a new commuter via the cycle to work scheme at work as a sort of "well done"


Just switch out the tyres for road ones and you'll feel a big difference in the ride if yours has chunky mountain bike tyres.


I considered that, but a good chunk of the ride in is on a "cycle path" that is loose surface so the bigger tyres are a blessing for that.


You can get some some pretty decent MTB tyres these days that will still handle a looser surface whilst giving you gains on roads as well. It really does make things much easier compared to the oversized tyres that a lot of mountain bikes come with.


I shall look into it, need to hope I can re0attache the pedal arm thing and it not be more than just the bolt coming loose over time first.

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Jenuall
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Joined in 2008

PostRe: Cycling
by Jenuall » Tue Jul 24, 2018 1:39 pm

Errkal wrote:
Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
KjGarly wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Have you considered panniers? I carry a fair bit to and from work and im sure the bastard uphill ride home would be a lot more uncomfortable with a backpack.

I haven't but it does sound like a good idea as I've got a laptop and change of clothes etc. to lug back and forth.


I've got 2 of these, theyre excellent. Large capacity, waterproof. Clip on and off the rack with handles.

https://www.outdoorgb.com/p/OverBoard_W ... e_Pannier/


Shall have a look into it, would need to get the actual mounts for my bike, only other bugger is the bike is the bike is a mountain type bike so worry it will look a bit daft on it.

One of these:

Image

I'm fine with riding it for work, its more effort but once I get into he swing of it it wont be so bad, and if I can get into it all I plan on getting a new commuter via the cycle to work scheme at work as a sort of "well done"


Just switch out the tyres for road ones and you'll feel a big difference in the ride if yours has chunky mountain bike tyres.


I considered that, but a good chunk of the ride in is on a "cycle path" that is loose surface so the bigger tyres are a blessing for that.


You can get some some pretty decent MTB tyres these days that will still handle a looser surface whilst giving you gains on roads as well. It really does make things much easier compared to the oversized tyres that a lot of mountain bikes come with.


I shall look into it, need to hope I can re0attache the pedal arm thing and it not be more than just the bolt coming loose over time first.


Cool. If it's just the crank arm that needs replacing/re-attaching then that shouldn't be too tricky, but if you need to service or replace the bottom bracket then that's a bit of a bigger job that may need some more specialist tools.

One of the best things about bikes is that pretty much everything in terms of maintenance falls under the DIY category, if you can get a few tools and watch the right YouTube tutorial then you can probably fix or replace anything!

ImageImage
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Errkal
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Joined in 2011
Location: Hastings
Contact:

PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Jul 24, 2018 2:26 pm

Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Jenuall wrote:
Errkal wrote:
KjGarly wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Have you considered panniers? I carry a fair bit to and from work and im sure the bastard uphill ride home would be a lot more uncomfortable with a backpack.

I haven't but it does sound like a good idea as I've got a laptop and change of clothes etc. to lug back and forth.


I've got 2 of these, theyre excellent. Large capacity, waterproof. Clip on and off the rack with handles.

https://www.outdoorgb.com/p/OverBoard_W ... e_Pannier/


Shall have a look into it, would need to get the actual mounts for my bike, only other bugger is the bike is the bike is a mountain type bike so worry it will look a bit daft on it.

One of these:

Image

I'm fine with riding it for work, its more effort but once I get into he swing of it it wont be so bad, and if I can get into it all I plan on getting a new commuter via the cycle to work scheme at work as a sort of "well done"


Just switch out the tyres for road ones and you'll feel a big difference in the ride if yours has chunky mountain bike tyres.


I considered that, but a good chunk of the ride in is on a "cycle path" that is loose surface so the bigger tyres are a blessing for that.


You can get some some pretty decent MTB tyres these days that will still handle a looser surface whilst giving you gains on roads as well. It really does make things much easier compared to the oversized tyres that a lot of mountain bikes come with.


I shall look into it, need to hope I can re0attache the pedal arm thing and it not be more than just the bolt coming loose over time first.


Cool. If it's just the crank arm that needs replacing/re-attaching then that shouldn't be too tricky, but if you need to service or replace the bottom bracket then that's a bit of a bigger job that may need some more specialist tools.

One of the best things about bikes is that pretty much everything in terms of maintenance falls under the DIY category, if you can get a few tools and watch the right YouTube tutorial then you can probably fix or replace anything!


Just had a look over lunch as I left it work and there doesn't seem any actual wear on the bracket, its a octalink one and everything seems nice and square so seems that the bolt has just worked loose over time and the ride in yesterday it went from tight enough to hold the arm to off which I guess is good as it means it didn't spend some time wobbling doing damage.

Anyways, I've done it up as best i can with an allen key (I dont have a torque wrench set to do it with that) so will have to keep an eye on it and order a torque set when I have the money.

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Errkal
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Location: Hastings
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PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:27 pm

Made and omg the sweat.

Bolt stayed tight the whole way even with a lot of hills, got home and was still unable to turn it so yay for now at least it is OK. Going to keep the Alan key in my bag mind you and check it after each ride to be sure as until I can do it properly it can easily loosen again

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Errkal
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Joined in 2011
Location: Hastings
Contact:

PostRe: Cycling
by Errkal » Thu Aug 02, 2018 8:16 am

First day riding this week as I hurt my foot last week in my sleep. Made it without busting the bike :D


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