Science - strawberry float YEAH

Fed up talking videogames? Why?
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1cmanny1
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by 1cmanny1 » Sat Feb 25, 2017 5:40 am

Preezy wrote:I was listening to Neil DeGrasse Tyson in the latest Joe Rogan podcast and he made a really interesting point that I'd not really considered before - we might find that if mankind eventually has the ability to populate and terraform other planets in other star systems, we will probably never bother to do so.

What are the reasons for needing to spread humans about?
- overpopulation on Earth
- Earth becomes too polluted
- to survive a single extinction event (asteroid, supervolano etc)
- to harvest minerals

If we have the technology to travel multiple light years, with ships carrying enough people to start a new civilisation (1,000 people? 10,000? 100,000? 1,000,000? 1,000,000,000?), terraform another planet and survive there, then we will definitely have the technology to mitigate all of the reasons for having to make the trip in the first place.

The only real reason we'll have is just to explore, which probably won't be enough of an incentive for the people putting the money up to fund the expedition.

I dunno, maeks u fink i gess x


That list is fun to think about.

Currently Earth won't be over populated. Watched a video the other day where they said the child birth stats have flattened off.
Tech can save over pollution. We probably could at the moment, if people truly got behind it.
Extinction event would be a good contender.
Possibly minerals.

I heard that the sun in the system being talked about will last a lot longer than our sun.
That could be motivation to move, but no one will worry about that for quite a while.

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Oblomov Boblomov
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Oblomov Boblomov » Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:46 am

I'd be extremely surprised if humans lasted long enough that our sun's death became a concern.

I'll bet you £5 we'll be extinct by then.

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Ironhide
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Ironhide » Sat Feb 25, 2017 3:44 pm

Of course we'll be long extinct by then, as will the next several dominant species/alien invaders/murderous robots that follow us.

5 billion years is an unfathomably long time.

Last edited by Ironhide on Sat Feb 25, 2017 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Moggy
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Moggy » Sat Feb 25, 2017 3:45 pm

Ironhide wrote:Of course we'll be long extinct by then, as will the next several dominant species that follow us.

5 billion years is an unfathomably long time.


Speak for yourself, I'm planning on sticking around forever. 8-)

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Meep
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Meep » Sat Feb 25, 2017 4:58 pm

Might as well be extinct ether way. If there is anything calling itself 'human' in five billion years it probably won't resemble us.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Moggy » Sat Mar 25, 2017 5:29 pm

Science and medicine are extraordinary, I never realised that it was possible to actually "build" a cock like this.

http://www.cracked.com/personal-experie ... aling.html

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Garth
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Garth » Thu Apr 13, 2017 8:24 pm

Ingredients for life found at one of Saturn's moons:
NASA's Cassini spacecraft discovered hydrogen in the plume of gas and icy particles spraying from Saturn's moon Enceladus. The discovery means the small, icy moon — which has a global ocean under its surface — has a source of chemical energy that could be useful for microbes, if any exist there. The finding also provides further evidence that warm, mineral-laden water is pouring into the ocean from vents in the seafloor. On Earth, such hydrothermal vents support thriving communities of life in complete isolation from sunlight. Enceladus now appears likely to have all three of the ingredients scientists think life needs: liquid water, a source of energy (like sunlight or chemical energy), and the right chemical ingredients (like carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen).

Cassini is not able to detect life, and has found no evidence that Enceladus is inhabited. But if life is there, that means life is probably common throughout the cosmos; if life has not evolved there, it would suggest life is probably more complicated or unlikely than we have thought. Either way the implications are profound. Future missions to this icy moon may shed light on its habitability.




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Peter Crisp
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Peter Crisp » Fri Apr 14, 2017 9:56 pm

Ultimate Jägerbomb.


jiggles wrote:Nobody with a VR headset is going to be using it regularly this time next year, let alone in 4 years time.


Posted 16th March 2016. Let's see.
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Peter Crisp
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Peter Crisp » Mon Apr 17, 2017 9:39 pm

Feel free to call me stupid for this question but I'm going to ask anyway as I know we have some physics teachers here.

Science fiction often contains references and entire plot devices for something called Subspace so does Subspace exist even in theory and if so can we somehow travel to it or through it?
My example is Babylon 5 where ships fly though subspace which isn't in normal space and travel through it is massively faster.

jiggles wrote:Nobody with a VR headset is going to be using it regularly this time next year, let alone in 4 years time.


Posted 16th March 2016. Let's see.
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Moggy
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Moggy » Mon Apr 17, 2017 9:43 pm

Peter Crisp wrote:Feel free to call me stupid for this question but I'm going to ask anyway as I know we have some physics teachers here.

Science fiction often contains references and entire plot devices for something called Subspace so does Subspace exist even in theory and if so can we somehow travel to it or through it?
My example is Babylon 5 where ships fly though subspace which isn't in normal space and travel through it is massively faster.


It's made up for TV/movies as a way of explaining FTL travel.

http://www.ex-astris-scientia.org/trekn ... rp3.htm#31

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Peter Crisp
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Peter Crisp » Mon Apr 17, 2017 9:52 pm

Moggy wrote:
Peter Crisp wrote:Feel free to call me stupid for this question but I'm going to ask anyway as I know we have some physics teachers here.

Science fiction often contains references and entire plot devices for something called Subspace so does Subspace exist even in theory and if so can we somehow travel to it or through it?
My example is Babylon 5 where ships fly though subspace which isn't in normal space and travel through it is massively faster.


It's made up for TV/movies as a way of explaining FTL travel.

http://www.ex-astris-scientia.org/trekn ... rp3.htm#31


Cheers :D .

jiggles wrote:Nobody with a VR headset is going to be using it regularly this time next year, let alone in 4 years time.


Posted 16th March 2016. Let's see.
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Meep
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Meep » Mon Apr 17, 2017 11:02 pm

Some theories posit that the universe is a kind of four-dimensional bubble. I suppose if you imagine normal space being the bubble itself (the membrane) then "subspace" would be something inside the universe (with the outside being "superspace", I suppose). I suppose they could be implying that they travel FTL by cutting across the inside of the bubble and thus jumping from one place to another faster than moving through ordinary space allows (when sci-fi mentions "wormholes" they usually mean a tunnel that passes from one point in the brane to another through the interior like a worm through an apple). Well, at least that would make some kind of sense. Probably doesn't hold up to actual physics but good enough for sci-fi.

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Garth
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Garth » Mon Apr 17, 2017 11:48 pm

Robot being trained to shoot guns is ‘not a Terminator’, insists Russian deputy Prime Minister
The android is expected to embark on a solo space mission in 2021

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“Robot platform F.E.D.O.R. showed shooting skills with two hands,” wrote Russia’s deputy Prime Minister, Dmitry Rogozin, on Twitter.

“We are not creating a Terminator, but artificial intelligence that will be of great practical significance in various fields.”

Mr Rogozin also posted a short clip showing of FEDOR in action, firing a pair of guns at a target board, alongside the message, “Russian fighting robots – guys with iron nature.”




It was nice knowing you all :dread:

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Peter Crisp
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Peter Crisp » Tue Apr 18, 2017 12:06 am

I'm going to hide inside VR.

jiggles wrote:Nobody with a VR headset is going to be using it regularly this time next year, let alone in 4 years time.


Posted 16th March 2016. Let's see.
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Ad7
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Ad7 » Tue Apr 18, 2017 12:22 am

*Tips fedor*
M'lady

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Moggy
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Moggy » Tue Apr 18, 2017 9:27 am

It has been trained to shoot guns but is going to be sent on a solo space mission? How are those things linked unless.....

...Holy gooseberry fool, Putin is going to invade the Martian capital city. :dread:

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OrangeRakoon
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by OrangeRakoon » Tue Apr 18, 2017 10:17 am

Exposure to cosmic rays will catalyse the emergence of true AI, at which point the robot shall return to Earth and liberate the USA in the name of the motherland

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Preezy
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Preezy » Tue Apr 18, 2017 10:26 am

NASA should be putting all of its eggs into the robotics basket. Why send humans into the risky areas of space (i.e all of it) when we could have advanced robots exploring on our behalf?

Basically I want to see the Interstellar robots become a reality.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Moggy » Tue Apr 18, 2017 10:35 am

Preezy wrote:NASA should be putting all of its eggs into the robotics basket. Why send humans into the risky areas of space (i.e all of it) when we could have advanced robots exploring on our behalf?

Basically I want to see the Interstellar robots become a reality.


Why bother going on holiday to nice destinations when you can just watch video clips on YouTube?

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Preezy
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PostRe: Science - strawberry float YEAH
by Preezy » Tue Apr 18, 2017 10:36 am

Moggy wrote:
Preezy wrote:NASA should be putting all of its eggs into the robotics basket. Why send humans into the risky areas of space (i.e all of it) when we could have advanced robots exploring on our behalf?

Basically I want to see the Interstellar robots become a reality.


Why bother going on holiday to nice destinations when you can just watch video clips on YouTube?

Exactly 8-)

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