Brexit

Our best bits.

Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?

Remain a member of the European Union
222
80%
Leave the European Union
57
20%
 
Total votes: 279
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Hexx
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hexx » Sun Mar 04, 2018 11:06 am

May has again ruled out passporting for financial services.

The EU instead will allow them to be covered by some magical trade deal

We are so strawberry floated

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Squinty
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PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Sun Mar 04, 2018 11:55 am

They will capitulate. They have to. None of these will work.

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Garth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Garth » Sun Mar 04, 2018 1:39 pm

I don't see why the EU would want to fudge a banking deal with us in place of the banking passport, EU countries are already competing to tempt the banks over to them.

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Lagamorph
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PostRe: Brexit
by Lagamorph » Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:08 pm

This will go down well,

Image

Lagamorph's Underwater Photography Thread
Zellery wrote:Good post Lagamorph.
Turboman wrote:Lagomorph..... Is ..... Right
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Alvin Flummux
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PostRe: Brexit
by Alvin Flummux » Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:58 pm

I don't think anyone wants some lunatic yank making their Cumberland Sausages. :x Probably be full of guns.

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Meep
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PostRe: Brexit
by Meep » Sun Mar 04, 2018 11:06 pm

* The UK made legal commitments in GFA and registered them with the UN.

* Customs unions are the only way to have open borders because you can only guarantee that anything passing from one side to the other meets standards without checks if both the standards on both sides are aligned. A trade agreement, especially one that allows you to 'diverge' in whatever areas you like, is not compatible with this. The EU already know this, hence their publishing their 'unacceptable' draft agreement last week. They are now just waiting for the penny to drop on the other side.

The UK government insists that it has an obligation to fully implement Brexit. Unfortunately for them, they already had prior obligations that made full separation from the EU impossible even before they tabled the referendum. Maybe they should have thought about that before starting the whole mess. The question now facing the government is whether the Brexit vote is a sufficient excuse to break the GFA and make themselves in international pariah, despite the fact that the vote does not legally oblige them to do so and the enacting of the result does not technically require them to.

The time is coming when May and her cabinet are going to have to decide what is more important: the fantasies of about 60 backbench MPs or the prosperity and international reputation of their country. Tick-fucking-tock. I have a horrible suspicion about where their priorities will fall but I am open to them pleasantly surprising me.

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KK
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PostRe: Brexit
by KK » Sun Mar 04, 2018 11:19 pm

Lagamorph wrote:This will go down well,

Image

I know American food imports have seen a bit of a resurgence at the moment in the UK, but I just can’t see British supermarkets going with stuff like this or the majority of the public being sold on it either. The Cornish pasty section is already minuscule, they’re not going to suddenly swap Ginsters and their own brand with a ‘Cornish pasty’ (which the Americans currently don’t make in any capacity, see also pies) made in Chattanooga.

One thing the British public has been steadfast on is wanting to buy British, now more than ever. Supermarkets know this which is why the Union Jack is always put on the front when it is.

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Garth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Garth » Mon Mar 05, 2018 8:32 am


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Lagamorph
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PostRe: Brexit
by Lagamorph » Mon Mar 05, 2018 9:21 am

How could anyone have possibly seen that coming?

Lagamorph's Underwater Photography Thread
Zellery wrote:Good post Lagamorph.
Turboman wrote:Lagomorph..... Is ..... Right
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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon Mar 05, 2018 9:30 am

KK wrote:
Lagamorph wrote:This will go down well,

Image

I know American food imports have seen a bit of a resurgence at the moment in the UK, but I just can’t see British supermarkets going with stuff like this or the majority of the public being sold on it either. The Cornish pasty section is already minuscule, they’re not going to suddenly swap Ginsters and their own brand with a ‘Cornish pasty’ (which the Americans currently don’t make in any capacity, see also pies) made in Chattanooga.

One thing the British public has been steadfast on is wanting to buy British, now more than ever. Supermarkets know this which is why the Union Jack is always put on the front when it is.


The British public will buy what’s cheap, especially when the going starts getting really tough.

Cornish pasties are just the headline, there are all sorts of products that the US would love to flood the UK with. And probably will if protectional status is dropped.

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Squinty
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PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Mon Mar 05, 2018 9:58 am

Lagamorph wrote:How could anyone have possibly seen that coming?


The first of many shaftings. We are a tiny set of countries, with an elevated opinion of ourselves. This can only go one way.

We aren't in a position of strength.

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: Brexit
by Rex Kramer » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:05 am

Hopefully the irony hasn't been lost on the Cornish voting for something that has directly strawberry floated over one of their biggest industries.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:12 am

Rex Kramer wrote:Hopefully the irony hasn't been lost on the Cornish voting for something that has directly strawberry floated over one of their biggest industries.


I think they know, seeing as they wanted their EU funding to continue and that they wanted the same exemptions that Grimsby (another Leave area) wanted. :lol:

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Hyperion
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hyperion » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:19 am

Discussed Brexit with a German yesterday whilst standing on a frozen lake. Fortunately the ice didn't crack underneath me, though it did deny us the perfect metaphor

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Ad7 wrote:stop moaning about it
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lex-man
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PostRe: Brexit
by lex-man » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:29 am

Taking back control and giving it to the Americans.

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KK
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PostRe: Brexit
by KK » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:29 am

Moggy wrote:The British public will buy what’s cheap, especially when the going starts getting really tough.

Cornish pasties are just the headline, there are all sorts of products that the US would love to flood the UK with. And probably will if protectional status is dropped.

That would be the catering sector where any issues are likely to be, because I just can't see the majority of supermarkets lowering their standards (which in many cases already exceed those of the EU anyway). Nothing is currently stopping supermarkets from importing cheap pies using foreign meat (usually from places like Taiwan and Brazil).

Bit too much hysteria (listeria) over this. It's not like "Greek style" yoghurts don't already exist despite it being a knock-off of Fage, along with various other products. Or Welsh lamb isn't competing against cheaper New Zealand Halal lamb. Or UK heritage brands like Cadbury's and HP sauce either made abroad or to much lower standards.

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lex-man
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PostRe: Brexit
by lex-man » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:37 am

KK wrote:
Moggy wrote:The British public will buy what’s cheap, especially when the going starts getting really tough.

Cornish pasties are just the headline, there are all sorts of products that the US would love to flood the UK with. And probably will if protectional status is dropped.

That would be the catering sector where any issues are likely to be, because I just can't see the majority of supermarkets lowering their standards (which in many cases already exceed those of the EU anyway). Nothing is currently stopping supermarkets from importing cheap pies using foreign meat (usually from places like Taiwan and Brazil).

Bit too much hysteria (listeria) over this. It's not like "Greek style" yoghurts don't already exist despite it being a knock-off of Fage, along with various other products. Or Welsh lamb isn't competing against cheaper New Zealand Halal lamb. Or UK heritage brands like Cadbury's and HP sauce either made abroad or to much lower standards.


It's really easy to get the made in England stamp though. A lot of 'British' beef and lamb is already from Brazil they just ship it over here as whole carcasses and then processes it in the UK. I'm guessing you could do the similar with Cornish pasties.

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KK
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PostRe: Brexit
by KK » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:56 am

Yeah, there would be nothing stopping a UK company shipping in American chicken and producing a Cornish pasty over here, but nothing is stopping that same principle being applied across the sector already (and already is on cheaper, usually frozen lines).

I just think throwing in US food like it's going to be the catalyst to cause the entire industry to offload gooseberry fool food on us when said gooseberry fool food and products of false origins already exist is over the top.

I've always liked my food to be made where it's supposed to be made, using ingredients you'd expect it to be made from, but that hasn't been the case for a very long time.

I don't want chlorine washed chicken either, or Tennessee-style whisky made in Poland, chicken from Taiwan, pork from some undisclosed location from the EU and so on, but that's why clear labeling is so important.

Just recently there was a big story about the pork in some parma ham being of shocking quality. Dodgy practices aren't exclusive to any one country.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon Mar 05, 2018 10:57 am

lex-man wrote:
KK wrote:
Moggy wrote:The British public will buy what’s cheap, especially when the going starts getting really tough.

Cornish pasties are just the headline, there are all sorts of products that the US would love to flood the UK with. And probably will if protectional status is dropped.

That would be the catering sector where any issues are likely to be, because I just can't see the majority of supermarkets lowering their standards (which in many cases already exceed those of the EU anyway). Nothing is currently stopping supermarkets from importing cheap pies using foreign meat (usually from places like Taiwan and Brazil).

Bit too much hysteria (listeria) over this. It's not like "Greek style" yoghurts don't already exist despite it being a knock-off of Fage, along with various other products. Or Welsh lamb isn't competing against cheaper New Zealand Halal lamb. Or UK heritage brands like Cadbury's and HP sauce either made abroad or to much lower standards.


It's really easy to get the made in England stamp though. A lot of 'British' beef and lamb is already from Brazil they just ship it over here as whole carcasses and then processes it in the UK. I'm guessing you could do the similar with Cornish pasties.


Exactly.

Also losing the protections isn’t just a cheap US import problem. UK areas will lose their protections from other areas. A Melton Mowbray pork pie would then be able to be made in Stoke, Cornish pasties in Devon, Scotch in Slough. Etc.

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lex-man
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PostRe: Brexit
by lex-man » Mon Mar 05, 2018 11:03 am

I personally don't really see the problem anyway. Another company could just make West County Pasties and avoid the problem.


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