Brexit

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Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?

Remain a member of the European Union
222
80%
Leave the European Union
57
20%
 
Total votes: 279
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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 9:52 am

Hyperion wrote:
Moggy wrote:
Hyperion wrote:
Moggy wrote:
Hyperion wrote:It was obvious who you were calling a Corbynite cultist and you've continued to do it since.
Why have I got to post in support of Corbyn or positive things about him? I'm against people blaming the actions of the Tory government on the Labour party
Your main arguement is nothing, you're not making an arguement, which will help you understand why Lib Dem's are irrelevant


I didn’t call anybody a Corbyn cultist. I said “People have compared Corbyn supporters to a cult before. And it’s not that far fetched.”

All your posts are not exactly making me think Corbyn supporters are not cult like.

You mentioned Cable before and now think I need to understand that the Lib Dem’s are an irrelevance? I haven’t voted Lib Dem since 2010, I’ve not “supported” them on here at all and I don’t think I’ve ever really posted about Cable.


All your posts don't make me think you're not a Lib Dem and that detractors of Corbyn and the current Labour party are not Centrists and Dads


And you say I can’t deal with a difference of opinion? :lol:


Yep


*irony meter explodes*

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Hyperion
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hyperion » Mon May 21, 2018 9:53 am

Moggy wrote:
Hyperion wrote:
Moggy wrote:
Hyperion wrote:
Moggy wrote:
Hyperion wrote:It was obvious who you were calling a Corbynite cultist and you've continued to do it since.
Why have I got to post in support of Corbyn or positive things about him? I'm against people blaming the actions of the Tory government on the Labour party
Your main arguement is nothing, you're not making an arguement, which will help you understand why Lib Dem's are irrelevant


I didn’t call anybody a Corbyn cultist. I said “People have compared Corbyn supporters to a cult before. And it’s not that far fetched.”

All your posts are not exactly making me think Corbyn supporters are not cult like.

You mentioned Cable before and now think I need to understand that the Lib Dem’s are an irrelevance? I haven’t voted Lib Dem since 2010, I’ve not “supported” them on here at all and I don’t think I’ve ever really posted about Cable.


All your posts don't make me think you're not a Lib Dem and that detractors of Corbyn and the current Labour party are not Centrists and Dads


And you say I can’t deal with a difference of opinion? :lol:


Yep


*irony meter explodes*


Come on Moggy, we all know you don't have an irony meter

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Ad7 wrote:stop moaning about it
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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 9:54 am

I think this conversation has run its course.

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DML
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PostRe: Brexit
by DML » Mon May 21, 2018 9:56 am

I always like these conversations between two people who must get in the final word. ;)

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 9:57 am

DML wrote:I always like these conversations between two people who must get in the final word. ;)


They normally involve you. ;)

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Hyperion
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hyperion » Mon May 21, 2018 10:03 am

Moggy wrote:
DML wrote:I always like these conversations between two people who must get in the final word. ;)


They normally involve you. ;)


But always Moggy ;) :toot:

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Ad7 wrote:stop moaning about it
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Garth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Garth » Mon May 21, 2018 10:04 am

Corbyn has faults but a Labour government with their current manifesto would still be preferable to another Conservative government for me at this time, so I'd choose to vote tactically in the next election to best damage the Conservative's chances if I could - but I'm in a DUP stronghold so my vote matters for strawberry float all.

It's similar to how I viewed the last US election. Hillary wasn't perfect either but I'd still have much preferred to see the Democrats in power and her as President over Trump and Republican policies.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 10:09 am

Garth wrote:Corbyn has faults but a Labour government with their current manifesto would still be preferable to another Conservative government for me at this time, so I'd choose to vote tactically in the next election to best damage the Conservative's chances if I could - but I'm in a DUP stronghold so my vote matters for strawberry float all.


I agree that Corbyn would be better than May. Or any of the top table of the Tories.

I think with Corbyn in charge we are doomed to many more years of Tory rule (probably propped up by the likes of the DUP).

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Poser
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Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne

PostRe: Brexit
by Poser » Mon May 21, 2018 10:15 am

Moggy wrote:
Garth wrote:Corbyn has faults but a Labour government with their current manifesto would still be preferable to another Conservative government for me at this time, so I'd choose to vote tactically in the next election to best damage the Conservative's chances if I could - but I'm in a DUP stronghold so my vote matters for strawberry float all.


I agree that Corbyn would be better than May. Or any of the top table of the Tories.

I think with Corbyn in charge we are doomed to many more years of Tory rule (probably propped up by the likes of the DUP).


Well, yes. With the SNP now being a thing, Labour would have go go very centrist to make any real headway with floating voters.

Torys 4 eva idst

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 10:21 am

Poser wrote:
Moggy wrote:
Garth wrote:Corbyn has faults but a Labour government with their current manifesto would still be preferable to another Conservative government for me at this time, so I'd choose to vote tactically in the next election to best damage the Conservative's chances if I could - but I'm in a DUP stronghold so my vote matters for strawberry float all.


I agree that Corbyn would be better than May. Or any of the top table of the Tories.

I think with Corbyn in charge we are doomed to many more years of Tory rule (probably propped up by the likes of the DUP).


Well, yes. With the SNP now being a thing, Labour would have go go very centrist to make any real headway with floating voters.

Torys 4 eva idst


I’m not sure they need to go full centrist, there’s definitely a lot of desire out there for a left of centre party. People like a lot of the left wing Labour policies.

They just need to tie it together with a competent leader and cabinet that can convince floating voters and that people can get behind.

The Tories at the moment should be vulnerable and beatable, they are an absolute shambles at the moment.

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Dual
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AKA: Stool Bloke

PostRe: Brexit
by Dual » Mon May 21, 2018 10:45 am

Hexx wrote:
Dual wrote:What is a centrist dad?


It's a slang/derogatory term that came from the left (Corbynites I think). It's where people (mostly men :P) have centrist and neoliberal beliefs.

It's often used to dismiss anyone criticizing Corbyn/Momentum as out of touch and cynical - particularly when they say "talk down to" (or "condescend") to the naive idealistic young'uns about their unrealistic beliefs/expectations.

View yourself as pragmatic and grounded in politics? You're probably an a centrist dad!

People that use it probably want to see themselves as the white che guevara :P


Love it :lol:

Sounds like me.

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DML
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PostRe: Brexit
by DML » Mon May 21, 2018 11:21 am

Thing is it was almost a fluke that it was the DUP that could give the Tories power last time. The kingmakers next time are very, very likely to be either the Lib Dems or the SNP.

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Garth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Garth » Mon May 21, 2018 11:47 am

Meanwhile, in opposite world:
Brexit has made Britain more welcoming to immigrants - Michael Gove

Brexit has led to Britain adopting one of the warmest attitudes in the EU towards migration and strengthened unionism, Michael Gove has said.

The Environment Secretary said the Leave vote had dealt a blow to the “identity politics” put forward by parties like the SNP and Ukip.

Then prominent Leave campaigner told a Policy Exchange conference on unionism in London: “Another feature of unionism, the explicit embrace of diversity has strengthened since Brexit.

“Britain has become more welcoming to migration since the Brexit vote as opinion research has confirmed.

“The act of taking back control has allowed British citizens to show that they can be more welcoming to new arrivals if allowed to be rather than required to be.

“And now Britain is one of those EU nations with the warmest attitude towards migration, mirroring the attitudes in sister countries across the globe such as Canada and New Zealand.”

Mr Gove attacked what he called the “divisive” identity politics of the left and right, saying Brexit had boosted unionist values of inclusion as it was a “vote of confidence” in Britain.

The Cabinet Minister said he did not agree with claims that the Leave campaign indulged in identity politics with warnings that millions of Turkish people could have been entitled to come to the UK in the future if it did not leave the EU.

Mr Gove said he did not believe Brexit would lead to Northern Ireland exiting the UK, and suggested support for Scottish independence had fallen.

He said: “Brexit has, certainly so far, strengthened unionist currency in our politics, not weakened it.

“Since the vote to leave the European Union in 2016, support for Scotland leaving the United Kingdom has diminished.”

Mr Gove said Prime Minister Theresa May was absolutely determined to find the right answer for “delicate” Brexit issues relating to the Northern Irish border.

http://www.dailyfail.co.uk/wires/pa/art ... -Gove.html

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 12:31 pm

DML wrote:Thing is it was almost a fluke that it was the DUP that could give the Tories power last time. The kingmakers next time are very, very likely to be either the Lib Dems or the SNP.


The Lib Dem’s are unlikely to recover and the SNP are so anti-Brexit that I doubt they’ll go along with Corbyn.

If the DUP collapse though then things will get interesting.

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Benzin
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PostRe: Brexit
by Benzin » Mon May 21, 2018 12:32 pm

Think Michael Gove needs a MRI sooner rather than later...

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 12:34 pm

“Britain has become more welcoming to migration since the Brexit vote ”

Did Michael Gove miss the stories of the government deporting British citizens? :lol:

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DML
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PostRe: Brexit
by DML » Mon May 21, 2018 12:51 pm

Moggy wrote:
DML wrote:Thing is it was almost a fluke that it was the DUP that could give the Tories power last time. The kingmakers next time are very, very likely to be either the Lib Dems or the SNP.


The Lib Dem’s are unlikely to recover and the SNP are so anti-Brexit that I doubt they’ll go along with Corbyn.

If the DUP collapse though then things will get interesting.


It doesnt matter if they don't recover, they will still have enough seats to be a likely kingmaker.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon May 21, 2018 12:58 pm

DML wrote:
Moggy wrote:
DML wrote:Thing is it was almost a fluke that it was the DUP that could give the Tories power last time. The kingmakers next time are very, very likely to be either the Lib Dems or the SNP.


The Lib Dem’s are unlikely to recover and the SNP are so anti-Brexit that I doubt they’ll go along with Corbyn.

If the DUP collapse though then things will get interesting.


It doesnt matter if they don't recover, they will still have enough seats to be a likely kingmaker.


Explain how similar election results to last year will make the Lib Dem’s kingmakers?

And even if they were, why would ex-coalition member Cable not go with the Tories rather than Corbyn?

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Squinty
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Location: Norn Oirland

PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Mon May 21, 2018 1:07 pm

If the Tories win a majority, they could easily discard the DUP shackles and defy them by putting the border on the sea. I don't think it's likely, but if they were free of them, it would provide a bit more wiggle room.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/worl ... html%3famp

More project fear!

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lex-man
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Contact:

PostRe: Brexit
by lex-man » Mon May 21, 2018 1:20 pm

Squinty wrote:If the Tories win a majority, they could easily discard the DUP shackles and defy them by putting the border on the sea. I don't think it's likely, but if they were free of them, it would provide a bit more wiggle room.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/worl ... html%3famp

More project fear!


The DUP have a lot of sway over Tory party even without holding them up. That's why the Good Friday Agreement happened under a Labour government because they weren't beholden to the DUP. Also the Tories want to keep the UK together so they'd be a fight in their ranks over putting a hard boarder between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK.


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