Brexit

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Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?

Remain a member of the European Union
200
78%
Leave the European Union
56
22%
 
Total votes: 256
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Photek
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PostRe: Brexit
by Photek » Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:26 am

Well looks like EU has done half its job already at dissuading other countries from leaving.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/19/no-eu-exit-for-us-say-italys-on-the-rise-eurosceptics

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Squinty
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PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:31 am

strawberry floating hell. This gooseberry fool never gets any better, does it?

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:17 am

Squinty wrote:strawberry floating hell. This gooseberry fool never gets any better, does it?


Cheer up, one day we will all be dead and wont have to worry about this anymore.

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Squinty
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PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Wed Sep 13, 2017 12:20 pm

Moggy wrote:
Squinty wrote:strawberry floating hell. This gooseberry fool never gets any better, does it?


Cheer up, one day we will all be dead and wont have to worry about this anymore.


Can't strawberry floating wait for the sweet embrace of death.

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Alvin Flummux
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PostRe: Brexit
by Alvin Flummux » Wed Sep 13, 2017 12:34 pm

Photek wrote:Well looks like EU has done half its job already at dissuading other countries from leaving.


Britain's ongoing shambolic performance is the major dissuader here, me thinks.

Jupiter is in your sun sign this week, making it pretty crowded in there, what with Jupiter being the largest of the planets and all.
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Garth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Garth » Thu Sep 14, 2017 11:11 am

Missed this the other day :lol:

Airships could patrol Irish border, says think tank

A think tank has suggested that drones or airships could be used to monitor the Irish border after Brexit.

The idea is raised in a paper from the Legatum Institute, examining how the UK and EU could resolve the border issue.

It states that "persistent surveillance of the border region" could be achieved through patrols by unmanned aerial vehicles or deployment of aerostats.

But it concedes "that these solutions are subject to a number of limitations, not least weather and cost".

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-north ... d-41232991

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lex-man
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PostRe: Brexit
by lex-man » Thu Sep 14, 2017 11:32 am

Garth wrote:Missed this the other day :lol:

Airships could patrol Irish border, says think tank

A think tank has suggested that drones or airships could be used to monitor the Irish border after Brexit.

The idea is raised in a paper from the Legatum Institute, examining how the UK and EU could resolve the border issue.

It states that "persistent surveillance of the border region" could be achieved through patrols by unmanned aerial vehicles or deployment of aerostats.

But it concedes "that these solutions are subject to a number of limitations, not least weather and cost".

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-north ... d-41232991


How would these systems help stop people importing stuff without paying duty? Or work out who's allowed into the country and whose not. Without any boarder check anyone can just walk through. This is going to stop anything.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Thu Sep 14, 2017 11:52 am

Airships. :lol:

How long will it be until the Leavers work out just how strawberry floating ridiculous this whole thing is? :slol:

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Garth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Garth » Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:07 pm

The red universe is bleeding through, someone better call Walter Bishop.

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Return_of_the_STAR
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PostRe: Brexit
by Return_of_the_STAR » Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:38 pm

Moggy wrote:Airships. :lol:

How long will it be until the Leavers work out just how strawberry floating ridiculous this whole thing is? :slol:


It depends how long outlets like the Daily Mail Online continue to spin the news (forever) and whether Facebook can crackdown on fake news (it can't)

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:54 pm

Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Moggy wrote:Airships. :lol:

How long will it be until the Leavers work out just how strawberry floating ridiculous this whole thing is? :slol:


It depends how long outlets like the Daily Mail Online continue to spin the news (forever) and whether Facebook can crackdown on fake news (it can't)


Whatever happens we will be out of the EU before it changes. It’s amazing though that some Leavers will look at the idea of airships patrolling the Irish border and think “that’s a jolly good idea!”.

The Daily Mail have flipped on the issue before. They used to be very pro UK entry into Europe, then turned against it. When Dacre retires/dies then there may well be a change in the papers attitude, especially if we are doing poorly, the EU is doing well and we have an anti-EU Corbyn as Prime Minister.

Facebook/Twitter is more of a concern, as they become ever more popular and the influence of the mainstream media declines, it will be essential that they find some way of combatting Russian propaganda and the trolls that infest them. And maybe they will but I have my doubts, after all doesn’t Zuckerberg want to run for President at some point? ;)

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Photek
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PostRe: Brexit
by Photek » Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:03 pm

I'm sure Russia are alarmed at how things are going so far, they want to split up the EU but the more the UK implode the less chance anyone else will decide to go the same way.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:11 pm

Photek wrote:I'm sure Russia are alarmed at how things are going so far, they want to split up the EU but the more the UK implode the less chance anyone else will decide to go the same way.


Brexit is probably going to be an awful thing for Russia. They were far better off with the UK inside the EU as the UK veto meant that further integration (economic as well as the proposed EU military) was never going to happen.

With the UK out of the EU, I think there is a good chance that the EU will be able to continue towards “closer and closer union”. Meaning, potentially, a nuclear armed superpower with a united economy, united politics and united armed forces.

If Russia did help the UK vote out, then I think they might live to regret it. :lol:

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Return_of_the_STAR
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PostRe: Brexit
by Return_of_the_STAR » Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:15 pm

Moggy wrote:
Photek wrote:I'm sure Russia are alarmed at how things are going so far, they want to split up the EU but the more the UK implode the less chance anyone else will decide to go the same way.


Brexit is probably going to be an awful thing for Russia. They were far better off with the UK inside the EU as the UK veto meant that further integration (economic as well as the proposed EU military) was never going to happen.

With the UK out of the EU, I think there is a good chance that the EU will be able to continue towards “closer and closer union”. Meaning, potentially, a nuclear armed superpower with a united economy, united politics and united armed forces.

If Russia did help the UK vote out, then I think they might live to regret it. :lol:


I was actually going to make this point yesterday when I read stories about Juncker saying that the UK would regret leaving the EU and he went on to call for further integration, full use of the euro etc..

As you say if the UK stayed in the EU we were never going to integrate any further. It just wasn't going to happen. I personally think it's a good idea for the EU to push ahead with those plans if that's what their populations want to do.

Last edited by Return_of_the_STAR on Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Photek
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PostRe: Brexit
by Photek » Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:18 pm

Times change and the situation right now could do but it seems to me, that at this precise moment, the EU (along with China) seem poised to be able to at least think about getting to a better place collectively and economically. The UK and US are in something of a quagmire.

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KK
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PostRe: Brexit
by KK » Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:26 pm

BBC News wrote:Sir James Dyson expects no Brexit deal

Leave campaigner Sir James Dyson expects the UK to leave the EU with no deal, and trade to default to World Trade Organization rules and tariffs.

Sir James, who founded the engineering firm Dyson, told the BBC such an arrangement would "hurt the Europeans more than the British".

Brexit uncertainty is an opportunity for firms to forge links with fast-growing economies, Sir James said.

However, John Lewis has said Brexit uncertainty was hitting the UK economy.

'No single market'

Sir James told the BBC's Today programme that Dyson, which became famous through its innovative vacuum cleaners, already pays the WTO tariff into Europe "and it hasn't hurt us at all - we're one of the fastest growing companies in Europe".

He said UK business did not need a transitional period to separate from the European single market, saying he thought the term "single market" was "quite wrong".

"It's a series of different markets with different languages, with different marketing required and different laws.... it's actually a very highly complex and broken up market," he said.

Sir James added that "business is about uncertainty".

"There's always uncertainty in business, about exchange rates, conditions in markets, natural disasters...

"I think uncertainty is an opportunity, and the opportunity here is actually that the rest of the world is growing at a far greater rate than Europe, so the opportunity is to export to the rest of the world and to capitalise on that," he said.

Parliamentary debate

However, the chairman of the John Lewis Partnership, Sir Charlie Mayfield, told the Today programme that the pound and business confidence had been hit by the Brexit vote.

"We should be under no illusions, Brexit is having an effect on the economy, no question. It's the same for everybody, and the main effects are sterling and confidence.

"Uncertainty is one of the consequences of this, and of course businesses never like uncertainty, because it makes it hard to plan for the future.

He called for "a serious parliamentary debate, to figure out what kind of Brexit we're going to have in the best interests of the country and the economy."

'Dyson degree'

Sir James' comments came as 33 undergraduates began studying at the Dyson Institute of Engineering and Technology.

The student engineers have begun a four-year degree, during which they will be mentored by Dyson's scientists and engineers who will teach alongside academics from Warwick University.

Universities Minister Jo Johnson challenged Sir James 18 months ago to help train engineers in the UK.

Sir James said: "It is a great opportunity, and I think a great step forward in the way that higher education is provided.

"We're paying these people, they're getting about 40 days a year more academic time than you'd get at university, plus the fact that they're working with some of the best scientists and engineers in the world."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-41265718

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:32 pm

The head of a rich company with factories in Asia doesn't think Brexit will hurt? Well no, that's because you manufacture in countries that pay a pittance in wages.

How does Dyson think British manufacturers will cope with the WTO tariffs? Does he think smaller importers are rubbing their hands in glee at the prospect of being outside of the single market?

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Garth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Garth » Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:40 pm

"I think uncertainty is an opportunity, and the opportunity here is actually that the rest of the world is growing at a far greater rate than Europe, so the opportunity is to export to the rest of the world and to capitalise on that," he said.

Europe can and is working on trade deals with other markets in the world too though, and they'll likely get better results working together than we can on our own due to their financial clout and having more experienced and larger trade negotiating teams.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:32 pm



:lol:

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KK
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PostRe: Brexit
by KK » Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:39 pm

It's actually just "The Union" flag in such a scenario as The Proms, as I found out on my free boat tour in London recently...

[/Pedantic]

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