Brexit

Our best bits.

Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?

Remain a member of the European Union
222
80%
Leave the European Union
57
20%
 
Total votes: 279
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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:46 am

Lagamorph wrote:Now the EU has all the cards and our ball.


:lol:

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Squinty
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PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:49 am

Hard Brexit it is :dread:

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Hexx
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hexx » Mon Oct 09, 2017 9:06 am

Errkal wrote:It's like she actually believes the "they need us more" gooseberry fool, they aren't going to do what you want, just keeping saying wheat we want or well just leave hasn't work so far stop just rewording it!

She really is a useless arse, she must realise this a total strawberry float up and is just hoping the EU will go, "ahh don't worry we'll give you everything so you don't have to look like a dick", it isn't going to happen love, either so this properly and stop making pointless speeches and hoping it will pan out or call it off because all your doing right now is strawberry floating everything for everyone all because you don't want to turn round to the gooseberry fool heads of your party and say "shut up it's a gooseberry fool idea get over it"


I don't think she believes it - but she knows the shrivel eyed wall bangers do.
She's just pandering to their delusional views of reality.

See Hammond/Treasurery is under massive amounts of fire for not being "positive" enough out Brexit. Jesus Christ these people are thick.

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Return_of_the_STAR
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PostRe: Brexit
by Return_of_the_STAR » Mon Oct 09, 2017 9:23 am

What amazes me is the the Labour Party almost got destroyed by the tories successfully blaming the financial crisis on their ‘overspending’ yet they don’t realise that Brexit will destroy the Tory party.

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Errkal
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PostRe: Brexit
by Errkal » Mon Oct 09, 2017 9:32 am

Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What amazes me is the the Labour Party almost got destroyed by the tories successfully blaming the financial crisis on their ‘overspending’ yet they don’t realise that Brexit will destroy the Tory party.

They are pig headed enough to think that people won't remember this bit and only focus on how the EU didn't give us everything we wanted and that they are to blame not the conservatives.

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: Brexit
by Rex Kramer » Mon Oct 09, 2017 9:40 am


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Poser
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PostRe: Brexit
by Poser » Mon Oct 09, 2017 9:45 am

:lol:

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: Brexit
by Rex Kramer » Mon Oct 09, 2017 9:52 am

I guess the difference is that one of those things actively wants to get strawberry floated and the other is going to get strawberry floated whether they like it or not.

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Photek
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PostRe: Brexit
by Photek » Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:46 pm

Watched those Channel 4 debates.

Both sets of people seem really annoyed. :lol:

The Brexiteers feel lied to and the Remainers have a sense of apathy but seemingly had no fight to do anything about it but accept that you're all f**ked. Bizarre.

Got triggered when Brexit guy brushed of the border issue here as a 'nothing' and 'it will be sorted easy'. :x

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Hexx
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hexx » Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:36 pm

So May briefed the press on her speech to MPs later - saying "balls in the EU's court"

Unfortunately the EU has responded (effectively "What the strawberry float you talking about? It's not a game get back to negotiations) and make progress!") before she's made her speech.

Have to see if her remarks (and the positive reaction she went on to say she accepted) stay in.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Moggy » Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:40 pm

Court is the wrong word. Our ball has ended up in the neighbour’s garden for the 16th time. The neighbour is about to knife the ball because he’s pissed off with us constantly knocking on his door demanding our ball back.

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Hexx
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hexx » Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:41 pm

To be fair - both sides agreeing there is a ball, if not where it is, is probably the closest thing to agreement during these talks.

Gotta love all the whinging about the timeline of talks/topics...after Davis caved and agreed in what..20minutes? during first meeting?

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Hexx
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hexx » Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:00 pm

May says she will not accept any physical infrastructure at the Ireland border.

She says the budget issue can only be settled as part of the overall deal.


We are so utterly strawberry floated

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Cuttooth
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PostRe: Brexit
by Cuttooth » Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:31 pm

I'm guessing Theresa May confirming that Britain will be subject to ECJ laws during the transition period might be the straw to break the camel's back for several Tories.

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Knoyleo
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PostRe: Brexit
by Knoyleo » Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:51 pm

Photek wrote:Watched those Channel 4 debates.

Both sets of people seem really annoyed. :lol:

The Brexiteers feel lied to and the Remainers have a sense of apathy but seemingly had no fight to do anything about it but accept that you're all f**ked. Bizarre.

Got triggered when Brexit guy brushed of the border issue here as a 'nothing' and 'it will be sorted easy'. :x

You mean this mound of gammon?


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Hexx
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hexx » Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:20 pm

Cuttooth wrote:I'm guessing Theresa May confirming that Britain will be subject to ECJ laws during the transition period might be the straw to break the camel's back for several Tories.


Back benches basically lining up in to shout 'No deal! not cave to scummy foreigners!'

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Return_of_the_STAR
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PostRe: Brexit
by Return_of_the_STAR » Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:25 pm

Hexx wrote:
Cuttooth wrote:I'm guessing Theresa May confirming that Britain will be subject to ECJ laws during the transition period might be the straw to break the camel's back for several Tories.


Back benches basically lining up in to shout 'No deal! not cave to scummy foreigners!'


You have to be of sufficiently low intelligence not to think that you wouldn't have to abide by a clubs rules if your want to remain a member of the club for an extra period of time.

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KK
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PostRe: Brexit
by KK » Mon Oct 09, 2017 10:27 pm

From Sky News today,

Sky News wrote:Brexit is an opportunity for UK firms, says eBay boss

Rob Hattrell says that companies using the online trading platform have seen their exports grow since the EU referendum.

Brexit should be the catalyst for Britain to put a greater focus on its small businesses, according to the UK boss of eBay.

In an exclusive interview for Sky News, Rob Hattrell said that Brexit was "an opportunity" for the companies who used eBay's trading platform.

"That opportunity comes mainly in export so we have seen a growth of export products from the UK from the moment Brexit was announced," he said.

Mr Hattrell, who took over running eBay UK earlier this year, claimed that response was not simply to do with currency movements, but also because of the "strong entrepreneurial streak" of British small businesses, creating products "that are loved and looked for all over the world".

"These businesses are very agile," he said.

"They are able to redevelop and reconfigure, and respond to macroeconomic challenges at enormous speed.

"That is crucial to being able to survive when you have a customer population that is changing how it shops on a constant basis."

Mr Hattrell joined eBay from Tesco, where he had overseen the grocery giant's general merchandise business.

He had previously been Tesco's IT director, giving him experience across both retail and technology - a combination that attracted eBay's headhunters.

His challenge is to continue to grow eBay's market, while also ensuring there is clear space between it and Amazon.

Industry sources say Mr Hattrell intends to add "more warmth" to the eBay brand in the coming year, while also dealing with the ramifications of Brexit.

"We haven't got clarity about Brexit yet but change is inevitable and it is just another change that is happening in the market," he told me.

"Ebay has been around for 22 years and in those 22 years shopping has changed fundamentally - in terms of growth of mobile, how people shop and interact.

"Brexit is just another change on top of that. You just have to focus on customers."

Around 80% of deals on the company's website are now being offered by businesses, selling to consumers.

The other 20% are consumers selling to each other - an area that, he believes, may grow if there is "economic pressure on household income because then one of the ways people can relieve that is by selling things using our platform".

Ebay is a global trading platform that supported $84bn of deals in 2016.

The UK business does not break down how much of that is done in this country, but Britain is the world's third biggest market for e-commerce behind the United States and China.

In common with other American corporate giants, the company has attracted criticism for the low level of tax it has paid in this country.

Its last set of financial results shows the UK company paying tax of £1.6m, despite turning over more than £200m.

"We pay all our tax in all jurisdictions," Mr Hattrell said.

"You have to look at broader contributions we make - at the people we employ and the businesses we employ."

He also said he rejected claims that eBay was not doing enough to deter VAT fraud, saying: "We work closely with HMRC - we share data and if we are notified of sellers who are not paying VAT then we will shut them down.

"We don't want them on the platform."

Mr Hattrell's view of the future is one of increasing speed, technology, ease and security - of nimble small businesses increasingly outwitting existing retail giants.

And he thinks we may have already had a clue as to how that future will work - thanks to fidget spinners.

In September 2016, there were 650 searches on eBay for fidget spinners over the course of the whole month.

Six months later, there were 650 such searches every two seconds.

The speed with which fidget spinners turned from obscurity to global craze was a lesson in modern sales.

http://news.sky.com/story/ebay-boss-say ... s-11074138

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Xeno
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PostRe: Brexit
by Xeno » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:02 pm

Is Mr Hattrell living in the same country? No one likes UK small business, unless they plan to merge it in to something like BAE and we can sell our "small business goods" to "our friends".

As far as I was aware exports to non EU countries our dropped and one reason they increased in the EU is down to our currency tanking.

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Meep
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PostRe: Brexit
by Meep » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:14 pm

That is a nonsense. Right now I could start up a company out of my living and start selling to any dozens of countries in one of the most affluent parts of the world with little to no paperwork involved for customs. The one thing that is going to change after Brexit is that there will be more barriers, if not tariff then non-tariff. Larger companies will see the money needed to pay lawyers to sort out compliance with other markets as small change. Start-ups, not so much. If you are an SME looking to export it's a real headache.

I think most of the larger companies will be just fine after brexit because they can absorb the additional costs it will kill off a lot of smaller ones that are just about getting by. IMO the government should launch some kind of "transition grant" scheme to help share the pain the little more fairly and give help to smaller businesses that could be hit hardest.

I also find the idea of "just walk away" kind of perplexing. The UK is the one that wants this deal most. It is the supplicant in these supposed negotiations; the EU is the much larger and more powerful trading block it wants access to. It's like a salesman saying "hey, if I can't sell you this car, I'm just going to walk away". Err, well, okay then. I don't think many people seemed to have grasped that trade agreements are generally terms dictated by a more powerful economic actor upon a less powerful one. I suppose after forty years of Britain being the single market the idea of not always being top dog is hard to get your head around.


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