Brexit

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Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?

Remain a member of the European Union
222
80%
Leave the European Union
57
20%
 
Total votes: 279
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Christmas CrackErrkal
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PostRe: Brexit
by Christmas CrackErrkal » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:03 am

Had we taken Gibralter pre-EU I could see why they would back up Spain, however we did not and there have been referendums to show the people are cool "as is" with the way it is ruled.

The whole warmongering thing is ridiculous and dangerous, I'm not sure what the right outcome is but I'm not sure i give much of a damn who rule Gibraltar.

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DML
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PostRe: Brexit
by DML » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:04 am

captain red dog wrote:War with Europe seems like a pure fantasy being pushed by Remainers here, but militarily the UK is far and away the most advanced and well equipped nation in Europe, by some considerable margin.

The comments by the Tories at the weekend were incredibly clumsy and an own goal in some respects, but the intent was to make it absolutely clear that there will be no negotiation on Gibraltar. Certain sections of the media have tried to turn it into something it wasn't.


Guess what...THEY JUST DID.

Its called Brexit!

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Partridge Iciclebubbles
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PostRe: Brexit
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:13 am

EU/Spain: "Any agreement with the UK will need Spanish approval over trade with Gibraltar"

Senior ex Tory leader: "WAR!!!"

Leavers: "The EU are picking on us!"

Remainers: "Wtf?"

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Partridge Iciclebubbles
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PostRe: Brexit
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:17 am

Pre referendum Remain campaign: "The EU has presided over decades of peace"

Pre referendum Leave campaign: "PROJECT FEAR! THEY THINK WE'LL HAVE A WAR LMAO!!"

4 days after Article 50 is triggered: "I Michael Howard, Lord and ex Tory leader, would like to remind Spain of the Falklands War, we'll fight you you bastards!!"

:slol:

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Harry Ola
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PostRe: Brexit
by Harry Ola » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:20 am

I'm not sure going to war with Spain would entirely help our Brexit negotiations.

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Preezy
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PostRe: Brexit
by Preezy » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:22 am

"We shall fight them on the beaches!"

"But the Spanish beaches are always really crowded"

"We shall fight them on the landing grounds!"

"What's a landing ground? Sounds like a beach"

"We shall fight them in the fields!"

"But we rely on Spanish fruit & veg back home"

"Alright, we'll fight them in the streets!"

"But the Spanish streets are full of drunk English people"

"Ah forget it."

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Christmas CrackErrkal
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PostRe: Brexit
by Christmas CrackErrkal » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:22 am

Moggy wrote:Pre referendum Remain campaign: "The EU has presided over decades of peace"

Pre referendum Leave campaign: "PROJECT FEAR! THEY THINK WE'LL HAVE A WAR LMAO!!"

4 days after Article 50 is triggered: "I Michael Howard, Lord and ex Tory leader, would like to remind Spain of the Falklands War, we'll fight you you bastards!!"

:slol:


Project fear was saying that if we left they would start on us, Leave never said we wouldn't start a war, besides we got to take back our Empire!

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Knoëleo
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PostRe: Brexit
by Knoëleo » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:27 am

Image

The whole situation is basically that skit.

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Squinty
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PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:25 pm

Kavanagh seems delusional in that article. There are a lot of flaws in what he has written, and some parts seem to slightly contradict each other.

McKenzie appears to be a warmongering and has an over inflated sense of the UK's power here.

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Death's Head
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PostRe: Brexit
by Death's Head » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:50 pm

Moggy wrote:How does it strengthen Leaver views? Other than the BS "the EU is picking on us!"?

EU trying to interfere with something that had nothing to do with the UK's EU membership.

Yes?
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Christmas CrackErrkal
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PostRe: Brexit
by Christmas CrackErrkal » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:51 pm

Death's Head wrote:
Moggy wrote:How does it strengthen Leaver views? Other than the BS "the EU is picking on us!"?

EU trying to interfere with something that had nothing to do with the UK's EU membership.

Have the EU interfered? Spain has said stuff and we have but has anything official come from the EU themselves on this yet ?

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Squinty
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Location: Norn Oirland

PostRe: Brexit
by Squinty » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:55 pm

Errkal wrote:
Death's Head wrote:
Moggy wrote:How does it strengthen Leaver views? Other than the BS "the EU is picking on us!"?

EU trying to interfere with something that had nothing to do with the UK's EU membership.

Have the EU interfered? Spain has said stuff and we have but has anything official come from the EU themselves on this yet ?


All I've seen so far is 'calm your tits' from Spain and 'we won't send a naval task force' from the UK government. Haven't seen the EU response to this yet.

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Death's Head
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PostRe: Brexit
by Death's Head » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:02 pm

Errkal wrote:Have the EU interfered? Spain has said stuff and we have but has anything official come from the EU themselves on this yet ?

I read today something about the EU saying Gibraltar type stuff would need to be approved by Spain.

*edit* This from the BBC website

BBC website wrote:The current row was sparked by draft Brexit negotiating guidelines published by the EU last Friday saying any decisions affecting Gibraltar would be run past Spain.

Yes?
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Knoëleo
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PostRe: Brexit
by Knoëleo » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:10 pm

I am disgusted that the EU would even think to consult the country with a hard land border with a UK territory when discussing how the UK will leave the EU.

What next? They'll be insisting we talk to the Irish, too. Outrageous.

bear
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PostRe: Brexit
by bear » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:10 pm

I don't understand the big deal. Spain has a border with Gibraltar so its only right and proper that any decisions affecting that border need their approval.

The same applies to the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

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Death's Head
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PostRe: Brexit
by Death's Head » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:23 pm

Knoyleo wrote:I am disgusted that the EU would even think to consult the country with a hard land border with a UK territory when discussing how the UK will leave the EU.

What next? They'll be insisting we talk to the Irish, too. Outrageous.

Did these discussions take place when the UK joined the EU? I think we need to see more on what the proposal actually means.

Yes?
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Hexx
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PostRe: Brexit
by Hexx » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:45 pm

Knoyleo wrote:I am disgusted that the EU would even think to consult the country with a hard land border with a UK territory when discussing how the UK will leave the EU.

What next? They'll be insisting we talk to the Irish, too. Outrageous.


Does Ireland have the same proviso in the document?

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KK
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PostRe: Brexit
by KK » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:40 pm

This will get a lot of traction in the coming hours, I'm sure:

FT wrote:Central banks are dumping euros amid concerns over political instability, weak growth and the European Central Bank’s negative interest rate policy — and favour sterling as a long-term, stable alternative.

Despite uncertainty over Brexit — formally triggered last week by prime minister Theresa May — central bankers from around the world see the UK as a safer prospect for their reserve investments than the eurozone, a new poll reveals. According to a survey published Monday of reserve managers at 80 central banks, who together are responsible for investments worth almost €6trn, the stability of the monetary union is their greatest fear for 2017. The results — compiled by trade publication Central Banking Publications and the bank HSBC earlier this year — show some respondents have cut their entire exposure to the eurozone.

The UK’s decision to quit the EU has not affected the popularity of sterling as an investment currency so far, with 71 per cent of respondents saying the attractiveness of the pound was undimmed in the longer term.

While central bankers said they would become more cautious about investing in the pound over the next few years, the survey showed many believe Brexit could provide an opportunity for them to diversify their portfolios further into the future.

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captain red dog
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PostRe: Brexit
by captain red dog » Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:13 pm

Howard's clumsy comment aside, there is absolutely no chance of war with Spain. Remainers are in a bit of hyped state about this! :lol:

Also Moggy, how very dare you. Michael Howard will never be one of my team you cheeky monkey! :lol:

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Death's Head
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PostRe: Brexit
by Death's Head » Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:22 pm

KK wrote:This will get a lot of traction in the coming hours, I'm sure:

FT wrote:Central banks are dumping euros amid concerns over political instability, weak growth and the European Central Bank’s negative interest rate policy — and favour sterling as a long-term, stable alternative.

Despite uncertainty over Brexit — formally triggered last week by prime minister Theresa May — central bankers from around the world see the UK as a safer prospect for their reserve investments than the eurozone, a new poll reveals. According to a survey published Monday of reserve managers at 80 central banks, who together are responsible for investments worth almost €6trn, the stability of the monetary union is their greatest fear for 2017. The results — compiled by trade publication Central Banking Publications and the bank HSBC earlier this year — show some respondents have cut their entire exposure to the eurozone.

The UK’s decision to quit the EU has not affected the popularity of sterling as an investment currency so far, with 71 per cent of respondents saying the attractiveness of the pound was undimmed in the longer term.

While central bankers said they would become more cautious about investing in the pound over the next few years, the survey showed many believe Brexit could provide an opportunity for them to diversify their portfolios further into the future.



We will buy the EU :nod:

Problem(s) solved.

Yes?

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