The Literature Thread

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Rex Kramer » Tue Aug 02, 2016 6:57 am

Parksey wrote:Any recommendations for horror, specifically a collection of short stories? Need it for a birthday present, and it's not a genre I've ever dabbled in.

Stephen King has written several short story collections (though I've only read the 80s ones). M R James is your classic ghost story collection and maybe Lovecraft?

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Memento Mori
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Memento Mori » Wed Aug 03, 2016 8:02 pm

Parksey wrote:Any recommendations for horror, specifically a collection of short stories? Need it for a birthday present, and it's not a genre I've ever dabbled in.

Skeleton Crew by King has Survivor Type ( :dread: :dread: ) so that.

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Poser » Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:18 pm

King's Night Shift collection is also decent. Several were made into films.

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Pan
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Pan » Sat Aug 20, 2016 8:25 pm

Cuttooth wrote:Started with Ulysses, which I still know I won't read any time soon


Have you read Portrait of the Artist? An essential prerequisite. As is Dubliners.

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St Nick
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by St Nick » Sun Aug 28, 2016 11:44 pm

Picked up the new illustrated version of Neverwhere recently for my first time reading the story.

Finished it this evening, it gave me the feels. I was so pleased when he managed to return to London Below..

De Carabas :wub:

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Rex Kramer » Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:25 am

St Nick wrote:Picked up the new illustrated version of Neverwhere recently for my first time reading the story.

Finished it this evening, it gave me the feels. I was so pleased when he managed to return to London Below..

De Carabas :wub:

I love this book quite a bit (though not quite as much as Stardust whose film is definitely a guilty pleasure). Just noticed there's a Marquis related short story on Amazon for £1.99/£0.99 kindle (How the Marquis got his coat back), tempted.....

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Pan » Tue Aug 30, 2016 7:29 pm

SugarDave wrote:It's a broad question but does anyone have any recommendations for history books? I'm not looking for anything in particular, I'm more interested for the sake of learning in general so if you have a favourite, throw it out there and I'll take a look. Wars, the rise and fall of empires, various eras, I don't mind.


Christopher Hibbert's book The French Revolution is a great non-fiction account of one of my favourite periods from history. Full of loads of interesting titbits about each character.

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Cuttooth
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Cuttooth » Sun Sep 04, 2016 6:10 pm

Have just finished Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, which is just as haunting and unsettling as billed, with a childlike naivety and futility running throughout. Having also read and immensely enjoyed (the also very unsettling) A Pale View of Hills am I right in thinking the rest of Ishiguro's novels are generally not as well regarded?

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Pan » Sun Sep 04, 2016 7:13 pm

Cuttooth wrote:Have just finished Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, which is just as haunting and unsettling as billed, with a childlike naivety and futility running throughout. Having also read and immensely enjoyed (the also very unsettling) A Pale View of Hills am I right in thinking the rest of Ishiguro's novels are generally not as well regarded?


Remains of the Day is both highly regarded and worth a read.

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Cuttooth
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Cuttooth » Mon Sep 05, 2016 5:37 pm

Knew I forgot a big one in there, thanks!

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Pan » Wed Sep 07, 2016 8:44 pm

Reading Time's Arrow by Martin Amis.

Darkly comic. Brave, considering his about the holocaust (kinda).

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Poser » Tue Sep 13, 2016 10:06 am

Memento Mori wrote:DT reading list


Quick Dark Tower reading list update...

Finished IT, eventually. Really struggled to get through it - found myself getting really distracted. I've always considered it to be my favourite book, and it was still amazing, but I think it's a book you need to read when you're younger and can fully relate to the kids. That said, in a neat parallel with the narrative itself, there were huge chunks I'd forgotten about. Actually, most of it. I guess that's the whole point, isn't it? Adults forget things.

So I flicked onto the first page of Insomnia, which I have also read previously, and... I ran out of steam. :lol:

I skipped it, read Everything's Eventual* and Little Sisters of Eluria, and now I think I might need to take a break from SK for a little while. I read The Girl on The Train (I know, I know...) and it was nice to read some pure, easy-going trash for a bit.

I might just skip Insomnia altogether, even though you said not to. I can't remember much about it, which is the problem. I'm just quite keen to move on with the direct DT stuff. Little Sisters... gave the me the taste for more Roland.


* I did have to google EE to see how it was DT-relevant - got my answer without seeing any major spoilers :simper:

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Memento Mori
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Memento Mori » Tue Sep 13, 2016 11:44 am

Insomnia is a difficult one to explain without giving spoilers. It is skippable to the larger DT story but you wouldn't appreciate it if you haven't read DT. If you've read it before and can't remember much I think that's fine. Were I doing a DT re-read again though I would read it.

I'm currently making my way through James Ellroy's Underworld USA series and he's become one of my favourite writers. If you want to take a break from King pick up The Black Dahlia which is the first of his LA Quartet.

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Captain Kinopio » Sat Sep 17, 2016 1:38 pm

Finished Plutopia recently which was an interesting look at the societies that were built around the US and Russia's race for nuclear armaments. Will probably read more around this if I can find it as it's fascinating. Would like to find something from the Uranium miners perspective.

After that I read the Harry Potter and the Cursed Child stage play. The story really was great, it surprised me how much of a page turner I find it, it's like I'd not been away from the book universe for well over a decade. The flip side to that is that some of the dialogue exchanges are absolutely appalling. Motivations and backgrounds are often ludicrously basic with huge swings in mood taking place over the course of a matter of words. In addition to that I'd kind of forgotten how little sense the wizarding world makes sense. I mean it doesn't really matter because it's for children but some of it is laughable. Nevertheless, great story and well worth a read for any Potter fan.

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by sawyerpip » Sat Sep 17, 2016 1:58 pm

Cuttooth wrote:Have just finished Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, which is just as haunting and unsettling as billed, with a childlike naivety and futility running throughout. Having also read and immensely enjoyed (the also very unsettling) A Pale View of Hills am I right in thinking the rest of Ishiguro's novels are generally not as well regarded?


I think The Remains of the Day is generally well regarded, I'm sure it won the Booker prize. I had to read it in school and although I wasn't initially interested in the premise at all I really enjoyed it.

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Memento Mori
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Memento Mori » Wed Sep 21, 2016 9:29 pm

Dark Tower TV news literature fans:

Memento Mori wrote:Idris Elba is doing the framing device for a Dark Tower mini-series. Based on Wizard and Glass.

MRC and Sony Pictures, which is releasing the film, have committed not just to financing a pilot but a full run of between 10 and 13 episodes, depending on how the scripts and story arcs develop. The Dark Tower show will begin shooting in 2017 with plans to premiere it in 2018, ideally around the time the film becomes available on cable or streaming services.

What the producers don’t yet have is a distributor. The darkness of the story rivals that of Game of Thrones, so they will require either a cable or streaming platform (MRC also makes House of Cards for Netflix, so they have a history already.) But MRC is not going to wait for a partner to come aboard before moving forward.

Elba has signed on to appear as older Roland alongside Tom Taylor, 15, who plays Jake Chambers in the film, a boy from present-day New York who harbors a secret, psychic power and is grappling with visions of the tower and the men (and other creatures) who are trying to reach it.

That duo will serve as the framing device for the show’s central story, which takes place many years before the events depicted in the film. Since the series will be Roland’s origin story, a younger actor will be cast to play the aspiring gunslinger as a teenager, back before the realm of Mid-World “moved on” into chaos and bloodshed.

...the bulk of the show will focus on the fourth book in the saga, Wizard and Glass, which told another tale of young Roland and his early tribulations.

Although written in the middle of the series, Wizard and Glass is primarily a prequel that features Roland and his ka-tet of fate-forged allies, including the boy Jake, listening to the story of the gunslinger’s past while preparing for the next leg of their journey.



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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Squinty » Thu Sep 29, 2016 6:00 pm

Been reading The Blade Itself and it's great so far. Not far into it, but I'm loving Inquisitor Glokta. His chapters are a really wonderful insight into being a disabled person, in a world that is really not fitted for his existence.

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Ironhide » Fri Nov 04, 2016 8:18 pm

I've just finished the most recent Expanse book, next one is out in december so I'm reading The Saga of Seven Suns series (Kevin J Anderson) again (would love a TV/Film adaptation of it) to fill the sci-fi space opera shaped void in the meantime.

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Squinty » Sat Nov 05, 2016 8:36 am

Finished The Blade Itself. That was a fantastic read. Need to track down a copy of the next one.

Started reading the second Foundation book. It's not bad.

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still
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by still » Sat Nov 05, 2016 8:42 am

Cuttooth wrote:Have just finished Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, which is just as haunting and unsettling as billed, with a childlike naivety and futility running throughout. Having also read and immensely enjoyed (the also very unsettling) A Pale View of Hills am I right in thinking the rest of Ishiguro's novels are generally not as well regarded?


I enjoyed his last book, The Buried Giant, very much but it wasn't that well received by some.


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