The Running Thread

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Mini E
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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Mini E » Sat Oct 03, 2015 6:01 pm

Decided to train for a half marathon. Can currently run around 8 miles. Just the final 5.1 to find then...

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Mini E
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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Mini E » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:04 pm

Just did my first ten miler... just the final 3.1 to go then...!

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Bunni
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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Bunni » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:39 pm

Done in 2:20 Ish? Not bad considering I signed up yesterday and I've been smoking so much more than exercising or anything.

Last 2k was steep downhill on cobbles. What demon planned that route :dread:

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Ad7 » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:44 pm

How often do you all change your running shoes? I've been using mine about a year and a half now and there's little sign of any wear, but one of the people I run with thinks it could be the source of my bad leg which has ruined my last 4 runs as it occurs about half way around and I'm nearly limping by the end.

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Corazon de Leon
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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Corazon de Leon » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:52 pm

Ad7 wrote:How often do you all change your running shoes? I've been using mine about a year and a half now and there's little sign of any wear, but one of the people I run with thinks it could be the source of my bad leg which has ruined my last 4 runs as it occurs about half way around and I'm nearly limping by the end.


You should be changing them every 300 miles or so is my understanding, although I don't do that and it seems only "professional" runners stick to it with any frequency. I tend to buy a new pair every year or so.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Ad7 » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:55 pm

They're like new really but she was saying the support is the thing that gets worn down.

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Corazon de Leon
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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Corazon de Leon » Sun Oct 04, 2015 1:10 pm

Ad7 wrote:They're like new really but she was saying the support is the thing that gets worn down.


That's it, really. The shoes will still look fine and be usable for casual wear, but the support wears pretty quickly so if you're running a lot, you need to change shoes regularly or you'll end up with poor support and probably in quite a bit of pain.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Ad7 » Sun Oct 04, 2015 1:29 pm

Yep, sounds like that's what I need to do. I can always keep my current ones for gym use anyway.
Think I'll go to one of those places that look at your gait etc.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Mini E » Sun Oct 04, 2015 1:57 pm

Ad7 wrote:Think I'll go to one of those places that look at your gait etc.


You 100000% should do this.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by mcjihge2 » Sun Oct 04, 2015 2:10 pm

Corazon de Leon wrote:
Ad7 wrote:How often do you all change your running shoes? I've been using mine about a year and a half now and there's little sign of any wear, but one of the people I run with thinks it could be the source of my bad leg which has ruined my last 4 runs as it occurs about half way around and I'm nearly limping by the end.


You should be changing them every 300 miles or so is my understanding, although I don't do that and it seems only "professional" runners stick to it with any frequency. I tend to buy a new pair every year or so.


I kept my last ones for 800+ miles (3 years), they were good quality Asics ones, still feel very comfortable to wear but the soles have got alot of wear on them. As Corazon says the internal support/gel could 'go', it does depend on the quality of shoe.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by mcjihge2 » Wed Oct 21, 2015 7:45 pm

I got my parkrun 50 t shirt today :D

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Rex Kramer » Wed Oct 21, 2015 8:56 pm

Corazon de Leon wrote:
Ad7 wrote:They're like new really but she was saying the support is the thing that gets worn down.


That's it, really. The shoes will still look fine and be usable for casual wear, but the support wears pretty quickly so if you're running a lot, you need to change shoes regularly or you'll end up with poor support and probably in quite a bit of pain.

I wonder if this is contributing to my heel pain, maybe I need a new pair too.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Starbreaker » Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:23 pm

Just catching up on this thread. My advice on new shoes would be every 300 miles or so for sure. Any more than that and even if they feel fine you're increasing the risk of impact damage by god knows how much - it's nothing to do with frequency of running or anything like that, it's purely down to the mechanical and elastic capabilities of the materials used in production. Even for a moderately good pair (in the £50-100 range) I wouldn't be going more than 350.

Mini E wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Think I'll go to one of those places that look at your gait etc.


You 100000% should do this.


I'm on the other side of the fence about this. The gait thing is bandied around a lot nowadays but there's very little to back it up in terms of hard evidence. In fact Runners World did a six month investigation last year and in the vast majority of cases gait made an immeasurably small difference on wear and impact damage. In fact it was more a case of shops picking up on this as the hot button issue and using it as an excuse to flog the more expensive shoes. I'm not saying don't do it, just take it with a massive pinch of salt.

Personally, my advice would be: buy a pair of shoes. Run in them for 50 miles. If you haven't picked up an injury in that time, you have a set of shoes that work for you.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Mini E » Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:27 pm

Starbreaker wrote:Just catching up on this thread. My advice on new shoes would be every 300 miles or so for sure. Any more than that and even if they feel fine you're increasing the risk of impact damage by god knows how much - it's nothing to do with frequency of running or anything like that, it's purely down to the mechanical and elastic capabilities of the materials used in production. Even for a moderately good pair (in the £50-100 range) I wouldn't be going more than 350.

Mini E wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Think I'll go to one of those places that look at your gait etc.


You 100000% should do this.


I'm on the other side of the fence about this. The gait thing is bandied around a lot nowadays but there's very little to back it up in terms of hard evidence. In fact Runners World did a six month investigation last year and in the vast majority of cases gait made an immeasurably small difference on wear and impact damage. In fact it was more a case of shops picking up on this as the hot button issue and using it as an excuse to flog the more expensive shoes. I'm not saying don't do it, just take it with a massive pinch of salt.

Personally, my advice would be: buy a pair of shoes. Run in them for 50 miles. If you haven't picked up an injury in that time, you have a set of shoes that work for you.


Anyone with a history of lower limb injuries should get their gait checked whilst they buy shoes - I've had massively ankle problems in the past and need support in certain places in a shoe as my gait is kinda fucky-uppy. It may be less important if you've not got any history of injury but I really don't agree with the "try it out and if you don't get injured you're golden" thing - prevention is far, far better than treatment.

Anyway - guys I've signed up for the Reading half marathon and raising money for Cancer Research UK. It'll be my first official half-marathon run so if anyone felt inclined to sponsor me I'd honestly be so appreciative. The link is:

https://www.justgiving.com/Andy-Mitchel ... =pfp-share

:wub:

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Starbreaker » Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:49 pm

Mini E wrote:
Starbreaker wrote:Just catching up on this thread. My advice on new shoes would be every 300 miles or so for sure. Any more than that and even if they feel fine you're increasing the risk of impact damage by god knows how much - it's nothing to do with frequency of running or anything like that, it's purely down to the mechanical and elastic capabilities of the materials used in production. Even for a moderately good pair (in the £50-100 range) I wouldn't be going more than 350.

Mini E wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Think I'll go to one of those places that look at your gait etc.


You 100000% should do this.


I'm on the other side of the fence about this. The gait thing is bandied around a lot nowadays but there's very little to back it up in terms of hard evidence. In fact Runners World did a six month investigation last year and in the vast majority of cases gait made an immeasurably small difference on wear and impact damage. In fact it was more a case of shops picking up on this as the hot button issue and using it as an excuse to flog the more expensive shoes. I'm not saying don't do it, just take it with a massive pinch of salt.

Personally, my advice would be: buy a pair of shoes. Run in them for 50 miles. If you haven't picked up an injury in that time, you have a set of shoes that work for you.


Anyone with a history of lower limb injuries should get their gait checked whilst they buy shoes - I've had massively ankle problems in the past and need support in certain places in a shoe as my gait is kinda fucky-uppy. It may be less important if you've not got any history of injury but I really don't agree with the "try it out and if you don't get injured you're golden" thing - prevention is far, far better than treatment.


Gait is something different - what you're talking about is footstrike, which is how the foot hits the ground. "Gait" is a catch all term comprising cadence, footstrike and leg movement in a single running phase. The former and latter of these have very simple, tried and tested rules for not getting injured and have done for decades.

Even so, footstrike is not necessariy something you need professional (such as it is in many running shops) advice with - it's ludicrously easy to figure out the form you use just by looking at your feet in a natural run position. By definition there are only nine variations to a greater or lesser extent that your footstrike is going to fall under and again, the solutions to each have been around for years.

It's great that you've found a solution to your own ankle injury but as a runner of 14 years I wouldn't be bandying around advice like that if there was even a modicum of a chance I thought it would cause anyone an injury. Running techniques can always be modified - as with any exercise, you should research yourself before committing your body to anything, but I find it a bit weird to go on the advice of anyone with less professional experience than a physio (especially someone with a mandate to sell shoes) and take their word at face value.

EDIT: I don't mean for that to come across as super confrontational, just personal experience. What sort of time are you aiming for in the HM?

Last edited by Starbreaker on Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mini E
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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Mini E » Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:54 pm

Starbreaker wrote:
Mini E wrote:
Starbreaker wrote:Just catching up on this thread. My advice on new shoes would be every 300 miles or so for sure. Any more than that and even if they feel fine you're increasing the risk of impact damage by god knows how much - it's nothing to do with frequency of running or anything like that, it's purely down to the mechanical and elastic capabilities of the materials used in production. Even for a moderately good pair (in the £50-100 range) I wouldn't be going more than 350.

Mini E wrote:
Ad7 wrote:Think I'll go to one of those places that look at your gait etc.


You 100000% should do this.


I'm on the other side of the fence about this. The gait thing is bandied around a lot nowadays but there's very little to back it up in terms of hard evidence. In fact Runners World did a six month investigation last year and in the vast majority of cases gait made an immeasurably small difference on wear and impact damage. In fact it was more a case of shops picking up on this as the hot button issue and using it as an excuse to flog the more expensive shoes. I'm not saying don't do it, just take it with a massive pinch of salt.

Personally, my advice would be: buy a pair of shoes. Run in them for 50 miles. If you haven't picked up an injury in that time, you have a set of shoes that work for you.


Anyone with a history of lower limb injuries should get their gait checked whilst they buy shoes - I've had massively ankle problems in the past and need support in certain places in a shoe as my gait is kinda fucky-uppy. It may be less important if you've not got any history of injury but I really don't agree with the "try it out and if you don't get injured you're golden" thing - prevention is far, far better than treatment.


Gait is something different - what you're talking about is footstrike, which is how the foot hits the ground. "Gait" is a catch all term comprising cadence, footstrike and leg movement in a single running phase. The former and latter of these have very simple, tried and tested rules for not getting injured and have done for decades.

Even so, footstrike is not necessariy something you need professional (such as it is in many running shops) advice with - it's ludicrously easy to figure out the form you use just by looking at your feet in a natural run position. By definition there are only nine variations to a greater or lesser extent that your footstrike is going to fall under and again, the solutions to each have been around for years.

It's great that you've found a solution to your own ankle injury but as a runner of 14 years I wouldn't be bandying around advice like that if there was even a modicum of a chance I thought it would cause anyone an injury. Running techniques can always be modified - as with any exercise, you should research yourself before committing your body to anything.


I am aware of this - Biomechanics was a large part of my undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. I completely agree that bandying advice around with even a modicum of a chance that it could cause injury is a horrific idea - but I fail to see how getting a professional analysis could lead to injury... In my opinion, the more informed a decision the better when it comes to something as important as footwear choice when running long distances. Agree to disagree?

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Starbreaker » Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:13 pm

Yes, absolutely - see edit in previous post. When is the Reading half?

To be honest it's brilliant seeing some life in this thread for a change. Anyone had a good run recently? Or planned? I'm doing the Snowdonia half next year which should be fun.

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Mini E » Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:21 pm

Didn't take it as confrontational mate ;) All good - thanks for the clarification though! If I was doing it alone I'd be aiming for a 1:45-1:50 but I'm running it with a friend who is female and has shorter legs and I think we're planning on running it together as we're running for the same charity and it's both of our first official half-marathons. It's Sunday 3rd April so quite a way off yet. I'm doing an 11.5 miler on Friday just to keep my body used to the longer runs and then I'm focusing on non-weight bearing cardio during the week :) Have you got any good runs lined up?

Edit: That Snowdonia run looks horrific :lol:

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Starbreaker » Wed Oct 21, 2015 10:34 pm

Nothing unfortunately. I was a bit of a silly billy at the end of July - aimed for a half marathon pb (which I got) but went at it faaaar too hard. Felt a cramp about seven miles in. Upside: Finished in 1:39.40. Downside: massive, incredibly painful tendonitis for the last three months which for the first six weeks pretty much scuppered my ability to walk, never mind run. In retrospect I should have known to slow down when I broke my 5k record by like...a minute and a half. Stupid!

Still though, been trimming down in the gym to stop me going mad and aiming to be back out there in mid-November, just in time for the cramp season.

Do you use strava Mini E? Any training plans pencilled in for closer to the time?

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PostRe: The Running Thread
by Mini E » Thu Oct 22, 2015 6:27 am

Doing your quickest 5k as part of a half-marathon is quite an impressive/odd feat :lol: - I don't use Strava no - I use Nike plus to link up with a few of my friends and monitor our progress. I was planning on doing what I do now to be honest, one longer (~10 mile) run every fortnight with recovery time between which involves a mix of cycle/rowing HIIT and resistance training as I'm still trying to shed the last bit of tummy... 4kg or so to go until I'm at target weight (although I really should do body comp on myself at some point to compare it to previous incarnations.

What're your recommendations in the weeks/couple of months immediately before the run? Obviously I increase carb intake in the days running up to a longer run but generally I'm on lower-carb, higher-protein diet.


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