US Politics

Fed up talking videogames? Why?
User avatar
Alvin Flummux
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Wilmington, OH, USA
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by Alvin Flummux » Wed Aug 15, 2018 1:20 am

The jury's conclusion will have enormous implications for the rest of the Mueller investigation. I hope they throw the book at him.

User avatar
KK
Moderator
Joined in 2008
Location: Botswana
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by KK » Wed Aug 15, 2018 7:46 am

Penn [and Teller]:

Does Mark Burnett have tapes of President Trump saying damaging things during Celebrity Apprentice? [Omarosa Manigault Newman has backed the claim that there is a tape of Trump using the N-word on Celebrity Apprentice. Not to be confused with the Access Hollywood tape, the alleged pee tape, the tapes Omarosa made in the White House, or the tapes Michael Cohen made of Trump.]
Yeah, I was in the room.

You’ve heard him say …
Oh, yeah.

Can you tell me what you’ve heard him say?
No. If Donald Trump had not become president, I would tell you all the stories. But the stakes are now high and I am an unreliable narrator. What I do, as much as anything, is I’m a storyteller. And storytellers are liars. So I can emotionally tell you things that happened racially, sexually, and that showed stupidity and lack of compassion when I was in the room with Donald Trump and I guarantee you that I will get details wrong. I would not feel comfortable talking about what I felt I saw in that room — because when I was on that show I was sleeping four to five hours a night. I was uncomfortable. “Stress” is the wrong word, but I was not at my best. Then at the end of a day, they put you in a room and they bring out a guy [Trump] who has no power whatsoever and he’s capricious and petty and …

You’ve got to pretend to care what he thinks.
Yeah! It’s your job. You sit at this table and this man rambles — pontificates is giving him too much credit. And because you live in the modern world you’ve heard Trump ramble. But you’ve heard Trump ramble when he thinks he’s being careful. Imagine when he feels he can be frank. And I will tell you things, but I will very conscientiously not give you quotations because I believe that would be morally wrong. I’m not trying to protect myself. This really is a moral thing.

Just so I’m clear: It’s a moral thing because it would be wrong to misquote him or because you don’t want to unduly have an effect on politics?
If he hadn’t become president, I would be telling stories all day long. And if someone were to say, “Penn didn’t get that exactly right,” you’d go “Who cares?”

But now being accurate matters more.
Yeah, the stakes are really high. Not for me. Nothing I can say here hurts my career. But for the world the stakes are higher. He [President Trump] would be reading. And what I’m trying to do here is tell you the story emotionally without telling you specifics.

Okay, I think I follow your logic.
He would say racially insensitive things that made me uncomfortable. I don’t think he ever said anything in that room like “African-Americans are inferior” or anything about rape or grabbing women, but of those two hours every other day in a room with him, every ten minutes was fingernails on chalkboard. He would ask one cast member if he’d rather have sex with this woman or that woman. He would be reading on the web about a real-estate deal he’d made — like he’d sold his house for a certain amount and someone on some blog had said he should have gotten more. Then he would turn and say that making X amount on a house makes him a good businessman, right? I would say to him, “What are you talking about? You don’t know who it is reporting that. Is that Forbes?” He had no idea. So when it came to think about supporting him for president, I digested that information from being on the show with him and said, “Absolutely not. He would be a terrible president.” And because I’d been around him and some people cared what I thought, I said that publicly every chance I got — while also saying he’s a good reality show. You want someone capricious and petty and narcissistic to be on your reality show. And boy, I hate to say this, but playing tapes of him doing that job might be unfair. I want those tapes to be used against him, but it might be unfair.

Because whatever he might’ve said was occurring in the larger context of being on a reality show?
Yeah. You have friends who would say stuff to you over supper that, if you pulled out that chunk, you could ruin their career. But you’ve known them their whole life. You know the exact context. Context is really tricky.

The rest: http://www.vulture.com/2018/08/penn-jil ... ation.html

Image
User avatar
KK
Moderator
Joined in 2008
Location: Botswana
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by KK » Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:27 am

The Trump Slump Hits U.S. Tourism

Despite a world-wide boom in travel, ever since our forty-fifth president was elected, tourism to the United States from foreign countries has steadily dropped.

Summertime, but where are the foreign tourists?

Ever since our forty-fifth president was elected, tourism to the United States from foreign countries has steadily dropped—in the face of a world-wide boom in travel—and the authoritative U.S. Travel Association has just provided me with figures projecting a further drop in 2018, from a share of worldwide tourism of 12.0 percent in 2017 to 11.7 percent this year. And this is after a drop in Trump’s first year in office from 12.9 percent. Though the numbers and differentials look small in percentages, they are large in terms of dollars not spent here by foreign tourists and they have serious negative implications for jobs not created.

What has caused this series of drops in foreign tourism since Donald Trump was sworn in as president? Trump’s rhetoric and new policies and rules and regulations regarding travel have combined to blot America’s long-standing image as a welcoming nation.

And of course his travel ban, a barely disguised version of the total ban on Muslims being allowed into this country he announced during his presidential campaign, inflamed worldwide opinion and in practical terms it barred visits by citizens of seven entire countries in the name of preventing terrorist attacks (though none have come from the countries the ban singled out).

The administration’s treatment of people attempting to flee here from violence-wracked Central American countries and Trump’s rhetoric about Mexico from the moment he entered the presidential race hasn’t encouraged Hispanics to come see our wondrous sights and enjoy our beautiful beaches. Trump’s withdrawal of the U.S. from the Paris Climate Accord hasn’t helped, nor have his rows with the leaders of friendly nations, which began almost from when he took office. Neither has Trump’s launching of a trade war. New visa-vetting policies have also caused delays and denials that didn’t used to occur. The invasive new tightening of airport security has put off numerous travelers to this country.

Maybe all these changes have prevented would-be terrorists from entering the U.S., but they for sure have also discouraged or denied many visitors with benign intentions.

The drop in tourism in 2017 was precipitous, and its velocity can be mainly attributed to one factor, what’s come to be called in the tourism industry the Trump slump. Earlier this year, Reuters quoted the head of a German company that specializes in trips to the United States as saying, “Politics is not helping us.” He added that since the price of the dollar was falling at that time, “we should have seen a much bigger increase in demand.” The Pew Research Center Reserve found earlier this year that a survey of ten nations showed that a favorable opinion of the US occurred in only one country: Russia. The inescapable fact is that Trump’s presidency has coincided with an unprecedented drop in travel to the United States. The US’s share in worldwide travel increased steadily until 2015. While some attribute the recent drop in tourism to the U.S. to a strong dollar, in fact, the dollar was strong in 2015, when our tourism growth was at its apex, and it was strong in 2016. Yet when it declined in 2017, which should have helped tourism, foreign tourism to the U.S. dropped steeply that year. (After starting off weak earlier this year, the dollar’s been gaining in strength robustly, and the recent tightening of credit by the Federal Reserve will likely send the dollar even higher—which isn’t good for U.S. exports, which includes tourism.)

As it turns out, the US is one of only two countries in the developed world that saw a net drop in foreign travel from 2015 through 2017: the other nation sharing this dismal fate is that less-than-shining democratic beacon, Turkey, which comes out last in a ranking of 13 countries in terms of their share of people choosing to visit them. The U.S. comes in second-last. The governments of the United Kingdom and the U.S. have advised tourists to be wary of terrorism and violence in Turkey, whose authoritarian government is operating under a State of Emergency, and which suffered a precipitous drop in tourism in the past year. The only positive thing to say about the decline of tourism in the U.S. is that it hasn’t been as bad as Turkey’s —but the margin isn’t very wide. Recall that this downturn in travel to the U.S. has taken place amid a world-wide travel boom.

Here are the rankings in terms of percentage changes of various countries’ share of international tourism in 2017, according to the U.S. Travel Association:

    Spain: +32.7%
    Australia: +22%
    Canada: +21.2%
    Saudi Arabia +20.3%
    United Kingdom: +17.9%
    United Arab Emirates: 16.5%
    Thailand: +13.9%
    China: +9.3%
    Germany: +8%
    France: +4%
    Italy: +2.2%
    US: -6%
    Turkey: -6.7%

The overall growth in world-wide tourism during this same period was nearly 8%.

Now, some countries, such as France and Italy, already had enjoyed high levels of tourism, so they had less ground to make up; and contrarily, tourism in Saudi Arabia and the Emirates showed much larger advances in their share of international travel. Apparently there’s no keeping people from visiting Great Britain, but its impending (or so it seemed) withdrawal from the European Union may well have encouraged visits before that became more difficult.

Our pathetic drop in tourism at the same time that it’s growing almost everywhere else in the developed world has had a striking negative impact on our economy. The USTA (which is more careful about tourism statistics than the Commerce Department) estimates that if this country had merely maintained its share of the travel market it had in 2015 it would have received 7.4 million more visitors from abroad and $32.2 billion more in spending by tourists, which would have created 100,000 more jobs. After all, since tourism is counted as an export, for a president who rants about imbalance of trade numbers and has promised to bring more jobs to the United States, his record in attracting foreign tourists—if he’s aware of it; and if he is, if he cares about it—isn’t impressive. (Just about no respectable economist expects the excellent 4.1 percent economic growth in the second quarter, often the best quarter of a year, to last very long.)

To add to this inauspicious picture of our standing in the world, fewer foreign students have been applying for graduate degrees in what have long been considered our world-class universities. As has long been well understood, the education here of foreign students helps us as well as the countries of origin, by leading to scientific discoveries that might otherwise not have been made, by spreading the idea of America and of democracy, and by raising the education level of countries we hope won’t succumb to malign forces. We can help groom future foreign leaders.) In the academic year 2017-2018, there occurred the first drop in enrollment by foreign students in the U.S. in ten years, by 4 percent, or roughly 32,000 fewer of them. The Trump administration has taken some actions that make it more difficult for foreign students to remain here if they drop some classes, transfer schools, or accidentally overstay their visas; and it’s considering such proposals as forcing students to have to reapply for a visa each year rather than just once, at the time of their enrollment.

What does all this say about the United States? Among other things it says that a great many others do not separate our country from our president, however unpopular he may be. The cartoonish balloon of Trump in a diaper that floated over the Parliament building in London during his visit to Great Britain in July was an insult not just to Trump but to the United States. It turns out that our having elected someone whose campaign and presidential rhetoric has at the least been unfriendly to other countries—that is, other than Russia and North Korea—turns out to have been quite expensive financially and culturally. Trump’s “America first” talk has in more ways than we may have realized limited our potential as an influential nation, not to mention as a world leader. It’s to be remembered that the abysmal drops in both foreign tourists and students all occurred before the president further isolated us by his tariffs and his increased belligerence toward countries that have been our traditional allies, not to mention his groveling to Vladimir Putin before the entire world. It doesn’t require leaps of imagination to understand why visits to the U.S. from the Middle East and Mexico dropped last year. Some Canadian columnists have urged citizens of their country to stop vacationing in the United States—in retaliation for Trump’s new tariffs and his rudeness to their leader Justin Trudeau and as a moral position against his thinly cloaked Muslim ban. As it happens, the number of people seeking asylum in Canada from below its southern border, has increased dramatically of late.

Unfortunately, at the rate our president is going, his policies and his becoming increasingly lathered up as some of his past political and personal activities are catching up with him, we probably have nowhere to go but down in important and potentially lucrative international travel. The boom in international tourism is continuing, but we’re not benefiting from it—and it’s not to be expected that in the foreseeable future we’ll see a great many tourists from the president’s best foreign friends, North Koreans or Russians, shopping along Fifth Avenue or hiking in the Grand Tetons. Like it or not, Trump’s face to the world is our face and his voice is ours. The costly—in several ways—drop in tourism and the decrease in curious foreign minds at our universities are not to be taken lightly, though they’re being ignored by the Trump administration.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-trump ... us-tourism

Interestingly, visits to the US from UK nationals has also dropped, the US moving into 5th:

Image

Funnily enough Spain has now become so popular (Germans and Brits the worst offenders), residents really want tourists to leave.

Image
User avatar
Harry Ola
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Harry Ola » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:16 pm

I'm not sure Trump really upsetting the former Director of the CIA is a wonderful idea.....



The already challenging work of the American intelligence and law enforcement communities was made more difficult in late July 2016, however, when Mr. Trump, then a presidential candidate, publicly called upon Russia to find the missing emails of Mrs. Clinton. By issuing such a statement, Mr. Trump was not only encouraging a foreign nation to collect intelligence against a United States citizen, but also openly authorizing his followers to work with our primary global adversary against his political opponent.

Such a public clarion call certainly makes one wonder what Mr. Trump privately encouraged his advisers to do — and what they actually did — to win the election. While I had deep insight into Russian activities during the 2016 election, I now am aware — thanks to the reporting of an open and free press — of many more of the highly suspicious dalliances of some American citizens with people affiliated with the Russian intelligence services.

Mr. Trump’s claims of no collusion are, in a word, hogwash.

The only questions that remain are whether the collusion that took place constituted criminally liable conspiracy, whether obstruction of justice occurred to cover up any collusion or conspiracy, and how many members of “Trump Incorporated” attempted to defraud the government by laundering and concealing the movement of money into their pockets. A jury is about to deliberate bank and tax fraud charges against one of those people, Paul Manafort, Mr. Trump’s former campaign chairman. And the campaign’s former deputy chairman, Rick Gates, has pleaded guilty to financial fraud and lying to investigators.

Mr. Trump clearly has become more desperate to protect himself and those close to him, which is why he made the politically motivated decision to revoke my security clearance in an attempt to scare into silence others who might dare to challenge him. Now more than ever, it is critically important that the special counsel, Robert Mueller, and his team of investigators be allowed to complete their work without interference — from Mr. Trump or anyone else — so that all Americans can get the answers they so rightly deserve.

Image
User avatar
Preezy
Skeletor
Joined in 2009

PostRe: US Politics
by Preezy » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:53 pm

Hogwash! Poppycock! Pigswill!

User avatar
Alvin Flummux
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Wilmington, OH, USA
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by Alvin Flummux » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:54 pm

It's a load of malarkey and no mistake.

User avatar
Harry Ola
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Harry Ola » Thu Aug 16, 2018 6:22 pm


Image
User avatar
Harry Ola
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Harry Ola » Thu Aug 16, 2018 6:34 pm

Also in other news sure to wind up Donny …


Image
User avatar
Alvin Flummux
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Wilmington, OH, USA
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by Alvin Flummux » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:13 pm

'Mon jurors, do the right thing. :dread:

If they exonerate him, the Mueller investigation is toast.

User avatar
Preezy
Skeletor
Joined in 2009

PostRe: US Politics
by Preezy » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:03 pm

I bet every single juror has a degree from Trump University.

User avatar
Tineash
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Tineash » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:57 pm

My unscientific gut says Manafort's going to be acquitted on most or all charges. The trial has just been....weird.

"exceptionally annoying" - TheTurnipKing
User avatar
Harry Ola
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Harry Ola » Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:07 pm

Tineash wrote:My unscientific gut says Manafort's going to be acquitted on most or all charges. The trial has just been....weird.


Better keep your gut away from this news then ….



They've asked 4 questions and will continue deliberations tomorrow.

Image
User avatar
Harry Ola
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Harry Ola » Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:11 pm


Image
User avatar
Tineash
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Tineash » Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:45 pm

It's gonna be a hung jury & a mistrial cos of one Trump-loving juror.

"exceptionally annoying" - TheTurnipKing
User avatar
Moggy
"Special"
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Moggy » Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:27 pm



:cry:

User avatar
Alvin Flummux
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Wilmington, OH, USA
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by Alvin Flummux » Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:54 pm

Parents expressing a desire not to be reunified either believe that their children will have better lives in the US on their own, or were coerced into making such statements.

I hope the Democrats flip the House and investigate the gooseberry fool out of this.

Apparently, Manafort is intended to be the first domino to fall, and that the jury asking questions about reasonable doubt may pertain to the lesser charges.

User avatar
Tafdolphin
Member
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Tafdolphin » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:50 pm

This morning: Trump's military parade, set for later this year, is postponed due to spiralling costs (budget originally set for $12 million, ballooned to $92)

This afternoon: Trump tweets he's cancelled the whole thing, blaming DC officials... For some reason.

Gemini73 wrote:Yes your are a sanctimonious twat

Bloggy blog blog blog.

Night Call: a game what I worked on
User avatar
Alvin Flummux
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Wilmington, OH, USA
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by Alvin Flummux » Fri Aug 17, 2018 3:56 pm

Tafdolphin wrote:This morning: Trump's military parade, set for later this year, is postponed due to spiralling costs (budget originally set for $12 million, ballooned to $92)

This afternoon: Trump tweets he's cancelled the whole thing, blaming DC officials... For some reason.


He cancelled it? :o That's great news! I'm sure he'll revive the idea soon enough though, probably move it from DC to Texas or Alabama or one of those other shithole states.

User avatar
Tafdolphin
Member
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: US Politics
by Tafdolphin » Fri Aug 17, 2018 4:03 pm

Alvin Flummux wrote:
Tafdolphin wrote:This morning: Trump's military parade, set for later this year, is postponed due to spiralling costs (budget originally set for $12 million, ballooned to $92)

This afternoon: Trump tweets he's cancelled the whole thing, blaming DC officials... For some reason.


He cancelled it? :o That's great news! I'm sure he'll revive the idea soon enough though, probably move it from DC to Texas or Alabama or one of those other shithole states.


He threw a hissy fit when it was costing too much:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKBN1L21B8

Gemini73 wrote:Yes your are a sanctimonious twat

Bloggy blog blog blog.

Night Call: a game what I worked on
User avatar
Alvin Flummux
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Wilmington, OH, USA
Contact:

PostRe: US Politics
by Alvin Flummux » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:36 pm

Trump? Worry about money? :lol: Pull the other one!


Return to “Stuff”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: <]:^D, dab, Garth, IAmTheSaladMan, lex-man, NickSCFC, Oblomov Boblomov, Pacman, Preezy, Reavus, Tsunade, Vermilion and 83 guests