US Politics

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Preezy
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PostRe: US Politics
by Preezy » Sun Oct 07, 2018 7:59 pm

Hahaha America is such a gooseberry fool hole. It's going to get far worse before it gets any better, strap in everyone, yahooooo!

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Meep In Heavenly Peace
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PostRe: US Politics
by Meep In Heavenly Peace » Sun Oct 07, 2018 8:09 pm

The Republican project to stack the judiciary as well as rampant gerrymandering and vote meddling is extremely dangerous. It threatens the Union itself if it is being dominated and controlled by a minority interest as it risks fermenting a secessionist streak in more liberal states.

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Peter Crisp
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PostRe: US Politics
by Peter Crisp » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:50 pm

Meep wrote:The Republican project to stack the judiciary as well as rampant gerrymandering and vote meddling is extremely dangerous. It threatens the Union itself if it is being dominated and controlled by a minority interest as it risks fermenting a secessionist streak in more liberal states.


I think a large part of the problem is that US republicans and conservatives see anything even slightly liberal as unAmerican and they will claim liberalism is a mental illness.
There's no room for compromise or respect for the opposition and it just makes US politics completely toxic.

jiggles wrote:Nobody with a VR headset is going to be using it regularly this time next year, let alone in 4 years time.


Posted 16th March 2016. Let's see.
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Rocsteady
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PostRe: US Politics
by Rocsteady » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:54 pm

I think the republicans will do surprisingly well this November. Possibly my Sunday sadness talking.

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KK
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PostRe: US Politics
by KK » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:55 pm

For those who want more judge-based shenanigans, I recommend watching Last Chance Lawyer that was on BBC2 tonight. Brilliant documentary series looking at an eccentric New York lawyer. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bnb9h8

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captain red dog
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PostRe: US Politics
by captain red dog » Mon Oct 08, 2018 7:47 am

If the Dems fail in the midterms, they really need to do a full ground up autopsy of why they are failing. It's inconceivable to be up against such a controversial president and party and continually fail. I don't think it helps that they don't seem to know where they stand. Are they centrist, or soft left, or hard left. They seem to flirt with all three positions and it gives the impression that they don't stand for anything.

It feels like they are just waiting for each election cycle at this point, rather than growing something ready for the challenge.

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Ho-Ho-Ho-tek
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PostRe: US Politics
by Ho-Ho-Ho-tek » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:34 am

Preezy wrote:Hahaha America is such a gooseberry fool hole. It's going to get far worse before it gets any better, strap in everyone, yahooooo!

I really hate posts like this, especially being married to an American. It's political system is awful but please refrain from calling the entire nation a gooseberry fool hole. Minnesota is a democratic state, not much they can about republican pricks.

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Harry Ellis
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PostRe: US Politics
by Harry Ellis » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:40 am

Many of its policies (mostly recent) are third-world-esque. You couldn't pay me to go there at the moment.

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Preezy
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PostRe: US Politics
by Preezy » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:43 am

Photek wrote:
Preezy wrote:Hahaha America is such a gooseberry fool hole. It's going to get far worse before it gets any better, strap in everyone, yahooooo!

I really hate posts like this, especially being married to an American. It's political system is awful but please refrain from calling the entire nation a gooseberry fool hole. Minnesota is a democratic state, not much they can about republican pricks.

Ok ok, jeez sorry.

80% of the nation is a gooseberry fool hole.

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Ho-Ho-Ho-tek
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PostRe: US Politics
by Ho-Ho-Ho-tek » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:49 am

80% of the UK is a gooseberry fool hole also.

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Partridge Iciclebubbles
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PostRe: US Politics
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:49 am

Photek wrote:
Preezy wrote:Hahaha America is such a gooseberry fool hole. It's going to get far worse before it gets any better, strap in everyone, yahooooo!

I really hate posts like this, especially being married to an American. It's political system is awful but please refrain from calling the entire nation a gooseberry fool hole. Minnesota is a democratic state, not much they can about republican pricks.


I don’t know how you can say that after what took place in Minnesota in 1987. :dread:

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Ho-Ho-Ho-tek
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PostRe: US Politics
by Ho-Ho-Ho-tek » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:50 am

:lol:

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Preezy
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PostRe: US Politics
by Preezy » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:52 am

Photek wrote:80% of the UK is a gooseberry fool hole also.

You won't find me disagreeing with you there.

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Partridge Iciclebubbles
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PostRe: US Politics
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:53 am

Preezy wrote:
Photek wrote:80% of the UK is a gooseberry fool hole also.

You won't find me disagreeing with you there.


It’s more like 52%.

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BID0
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PostRe: US Politics
by BID0 » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:54 am

Photek wrote:
Preezy wrote:Hahaha America is such a gooseberry fool hole. It's going to get far worse before it gets any better, strap in everyone, yahooooo!

I really hate posts like this, especially being married to an American. It's political system is awful but please refrain from calling the entire nation a gooseberry fool hole. Minnesota is a democratic state, not much they can about republican pricks.

He said America, not Americans.

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Ho-Ho-Ho-tek
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PostRe: US Politics
by Ho-Ho-Ho-tek » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:57 am

Preezy wrote:
Photek wrote:80% of the UK is a gooseberry fool hole also.

You won't find me disagreeing with you there.

You should though, apart from waiting for a train at Manchester Airport (to Liverpool) and seeing lots of prostitutes in the streets below the rest of the UK I've seen is pretty nice and if Forza Horizon 4 is anything to go by, it's pristine!

There's an Sainsburys just over the border (we don't have them in ROI) and despite the scenery around being nice, the shop itself inside and out is an utter shithole, left quite a bad impression of Sainsbury's for us, driving a Dublin Reg car in area with red white and blue kerbs and british flags everywhere was also un-nerving.

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Preezy
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PostRe: US Politics
by Preezy » Mon Oct 08, 2018 10:18 am

BID0 wrote:
Photek wrote:
Preezy wrote:Hahaha America is such a gooseberry fool hole. It's going to get far worse before it gets any better, strap in everyone, yahooooo!

I really hate posts like this, especially being married to an American. It's political system is awful but please refrain from calling the entire nation a gooseberry fool hole. Minnesota is a democratic state, not much they can about republican pricks.

He said America, not Americans.

Oh no, I meant those as well. Weirdos :slol: ;)

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KK
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PostRe: US Politics
by KK » Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:39 pm

BBC doing more of these long reads recently, they’re very good:

Homeless in Portland: A deepening crisis on the streets of America

They seem to be almost everywhere, in places old and new, no age spared. Sleeping on cardboard or bare ground, the homeless come together under bridges and trees, their belongings in plastic bags symbolising lives on the move.

Many have arrived on the streets just recently, victims of the same prosperity that has transformed cities across the US West Coast. As officials struggle to respond to this growing crisis, some say things are likely to get worse.

Vibrant Portland, Oregon's largest city, has long lured many. It is the City of Roses, of pleasant climate, rich culture and progressive thinking. It is also an innovation hub, part of what is called Silicon Forest, and new residents have moved here in these post-recession years attracted by its high-tech companies and their well-paid jobs.

But the bonanza, unsurprisingly, has not come to everyone.

Booming demand in an area with limited housing offers quickly drove the cost of living up, and those who were financially on the limit lost the ability they once had to afford a place.

Many were rescued by family and friends, or government programmes and non-profit groups. Others, however, ended up homeless. The lucky ones have found space in public shelters. Not a few are now in tents and vehicles on the streets.

"Even though the economy has never been stronger," Mayor Ted Wheeler, a Democrat, said, "inequality [is] growing at an alarming rate and the benefits from a [growing] economy are increasingly concentrated in fewer and fewer hands... We have increasing disparity all across the United States, and that's definitely impacting people."

His city is indeed not alone. Homelessness has increased in other thriving West Coast cities that are destinations for young, well-educated workers, like San Francisco and Seattle, where the blame has also largely fallen on rapidly rising costs and evictions.

Exact numbers are always hard to come by but 553,742 people were homeless on a single night across the US in 2017, the Department of Housing and Urban Development said, the first rise in seven years. (The figure, however, was still 13% lower than in 2010.)

Declines in 30 states were overshadowed by big surges elsewhere, with California, Oregon and Washington among the five worst. Los Angeles, where the situation has been described as unprecedented, had more than 50,000 people without homes, behind only New York City, which had some 75,000.

Continued: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-45442596

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Peter Crisp
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PostRe: US Politics
by Peter Crisp » Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:49 pm

I honestly feel that some Americans see those dystopian films showing a future where the rich have everything and 90% of the population are struggling just to survive are a model to aim for.
Being poor is obviously a choice people make and they can easily become massively wealthy if they just put a bit of effort in but they don't so screw them. They don't seem to realise that maybe having wealth more spread out evenly about the population makes for more customers who can afford to maybe go out for a nice lunch now and then or actually own or rent a house but no, it's all about giving the super rich tax breaks and making sure companies are never burdened by taxes or regulations.

They will honestly argue that someone like Bill Gates or Jeff Bezos will lose all motivation if asked to pay 30 or 40% income tax and just give up as why bother only having $25B when they now have $40B as that would be just terrible.

jiggles wrote:Nobody with a VR headset is going to be using it regularly this time next year, let alone in 4 years time.


Posted 16th March 2016. Let's see.
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Preezy
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PostRe: US Politics
by Preezy » Mon Oct 08, 2018 2:11 pm

Quite the quandary- a successful economy raises living standards but can also price out the bottom of the market.


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