We'll be in Syria any day now...

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Rightey
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Rightey » Mon Apr 29, 2013 1:59 am

Somebody Else's Problem wrote:
Shadow wrote: I dunno, there's just something about "giving weapons to the rebels" which doesn't sound like the right thing to do.


You mean all those times when it's backfired horribly? Like with Saddam Hussein, or the Afghan Mujahideen?


Or Libya?

Shadow wrote:I think the UN should have something in place to deal with civil wars that doesn't involve a bigger war. Like if you shoot on your own people an enormous UN force moves in and pacifies the situation and a general election is forced. I dunno, there's just something about "giving weapons to the rebels" which doesn't sound like the right thing to do.


Never going to happen, just imagine when protests break out in places like China or Russia or even the USA for that matter and people end up dieing. Do you think the UN would seriously step in and overthrow the government?

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Alvin Flummux
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Alvin Flummux » Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:26 am

The longer the civil war rages, the worse the post-Assad world will be; militant religious fanaticism is already showing signs of becoming increasingly dominant within the rebel forces. The once-uneasy but civil balance of the various religions and ethnicities present in Syria will either be bloodily and violently homogenized, or will be sidelined by organized Islamist groups who, as in Egypt, will dominate any post-Assad elections.

Jupiter is in your sun sign this week, making it pretty crowded in there, what with Jupiter being the largest of the planets and all.
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Jam-Master Jay
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Jam-Master Jay » Sun May 05, 2013 1:33 pm



:shock:

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Captain Kinopio
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Captain Kinopio » Sun May 05, 2013 1:56 pm

Alvin Flummux wrote:The longer the civil war rages, the worse the post-Assad world will be; militant religious fanaticism is already showing signs of becoming increasingly dominant within the rebel forces. The once-uneasy but civil balance of the various religions and ethnicities present in Syria will either be bloodily and violently homogenized, or will be sidelined by organized Islamist groups who, as in Egypt, will dominate any post-Assad elections.


Did you write that or steal it from somewhere else?

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Alvin Flummux
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Alvin Flummux » Sun May 05, 2013 2:14 pm

Herbi wrote:
Alvin Flummux wrote:The longer the civil war rages, the worse the post-Assad world will be; militant religious fanaticism is already showing signs of becoming increasingly dominant within the rebel forces. The once-uneasy but civil balance of the various religions and ethnicities present in Syria will either be bloodily and violently homogenized, or will be sidelined by organized Islamist groups who, as in Egypt, will dominate any post-Assad elections.


Did you write that or steal it from somewhere else?


I wrote that.

Jupiter is in your sun sign this week, making it pretty crowded in there, what with Jupiter being the largest of the planets and all.
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NickSCFC
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by NickSCFC » Sun May 05, 2013 2:23 pm

Alvin Flummux wrote:The longer the civil war rages, the worse the post-Assad world will be; militant religious fanaticism is already showing signs of becoming increasingly dominant within the rebel forces. The once-uneasy but civil balance of the various religions and ethnicities present in Syria will either be bloodily and violently homogenized, or will be sidelined by organized Islamist groups who, as in Egypt, will dominate any post-Assad elections.


For once I agree with you on something politics related, bet al Qaeda can't wait to set up bases in Syria :fp:

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Captain Kinopio
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Captain Kinopio » Sun May 05, 2013 2:40 pm

NickSCFC wrote:
Alvin Flummux wrote:The longer the civil war rages, the worse the post-Assad world will be; militant religious fanaticism is already showing signs of becoming increasingly dominant within the rebel forces. The once-uneasy but civil balance of the various religions and ethnicities present in Syria will either be bloodily and violently homogenized, or will be sidelined by organized Islamist groups who, as in Egypt, will dominate any post-Assad elections.


For once I agree with you on something politics related, bet al Qaeda can't wait to set up bases in Syria :fp:


Don't look now but...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-18048033

:dread:

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Rightey
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Rightey » Sun May 05, 2013 6:11 pm

Alvin Flummux wrote:The longer the civil war rages, the worse the post-Assad world will be; militant religious fanaticism is already showing signs of becoming increasingly dominant within the rebel forces. The once-uneasy but civil balance of the various religions and ethnicities present in Syria will either be bloodily and violently homogenized, or will be sidelined by organized Islamist groups who, as in Egypt, will dominate any post-Assad elections.


Just out of curiosity when was this ever not going to happen? It's kind of obvious that in a country where the majority of people are hard line Muslims, or at least side with them any sort of democratic process will lead to them being the winners.

It's like in Egypt how after all the protests and elections people in the west seemed surprised that they would elect a party with very conservative muslim views. It's the viewpoint shared by the majority of people living in these countries so the outcome will be obvious, what else could happen? It seems a lot of people were thinking more along the lines of "Oh they have democracy now, they'll be legalizing gay marriage within the week!" :fp:


Also, Israel is now bombing targets in Syria...


http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2013 ... syria.html


Israeli warplanes struck areas in and around the Syrian capital Sunday, setting off a series of explosions as they targeted a shipment of highly accurate, Iranian-made guided missiles believed to be bound for Lebanon’s Hezbollah militant group, officials and activists said.

The attack, the second in three days and the third this year, signalled a sharp escalation of Israel’s involvement in Syria’s bloody civil war. Syrian state media reported that Israeli missiles struck a military and scientific research center near Damascus and caused casualties.
SYRIA CIVIL WAR Key facts, important players in Syria's bloody conflict

Syria’s Foreign Ministry condemned the attacks, saying the “flagrant Israeli aggression aims to give direct military support to terrorist groups” fighting the government. Syria refers to opposition fighters trying to topple President Bashar al-Assad’s regime as “terrorists.”

The ministry, in letters sent to the United Nations and the UN Security Council, also said the Israeli strikes killed and wounded several people and “caused widespread destruction.”

While the government tried to use the attacks to taint the rebels by linking them to Israel, Syria’s arch rival, the airstrikes still pose a dilemma for an Assad regime already battling a relentless rebellion at home. If it fails to respond, it looks weak and opens the door to such airstrikes becoming a common occurrence. But any military retaliation against Israel would risk dragging the Jewish state and its powerful army into a broader conflict.

The tempo of the new strikes added a dangerous dynamic to the conflict, fuelling concerns that events could spin out of control and spark regional crisis.

Read about the changing tactics inside Syria's brutal civil war

Israel’s military on Sunday deployed two batteries of its Iron Dome rocket defence system to the north of the country. It described the move as part of “ongoing situational assessments.”

A senior Israeli official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in order to disclose information about a secret military operation to the media, confirmed that Israel launched an airstrike in the Syrian capital early Sunday but did not give more precise details about the location. The target was Fateh-110 missiles, which have precision guidance systems with better aim than anything Hezbollah is known to have in its arsenal, the official told The Associated Press.
U.S. mulling change in position

The airstrikes come as Washington considers how to respond to indications that the Syrian regime may have used chemical weapons in its civil war. U.S. President Barack Obama has described the use of such weapons as a “red line,” and the administration is weighing its options — including possible military action.

Iran, a close ally of the Assad regime, condemned the airstrikes but gave no other hints of a possible stronger response from Tehran.

Syrian rebels like this man clash with government forces

1 of 22

Israel has said it wants to stay out of the Syrian war, but Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has repeatedly stated the Jewish state would be prepared to take military action to prevent sophisticated weapons from flowing from Syria to Hezbollah or other extremist groups.

Israel and Hezbollah fought a month-long war in mid-2006 that ended in a stalemate. The militant group is believed to have restocked its arsenal since that conflict with tens of thousands of rockets and missiles.

Earlier this year, the Iron Dome system was credited with shooting down hundreds of rockets during a round of fighting against Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip.

Israel is especially concerned that Hezbollah will take advantage of the chaos in neighbouring Syria and try to smuggle advanced weapons into Lebanon. These include anti-aircraft missiles, which could hamper Israel’s ability to operate in Lebanese skies, and advanced Yakhont missiles that are used to attack naval ships from the coast.

Syria’s state news agency reported explosions at the Jamraya military and scientific research centre near Damascus and said initial reports indicate they were the “result of Israeli missiles.” It said there were casualties but did not give a number.

Learn about key facts, important players in Syria's civil war

Damascus-based activist Maath al-Shami said the strikes occurred around 3 a.m. local time.

“Damascus shook. The explosion was very, very strong,” said al-Shami adding that one of the attacks occurred near the capital’s Qasioun mountain that overlooks Damascus.

He said the raid targeted a military position for the elite Republican Guards that is in charge of protecting Damascus, Assad’s seat of power.

Mohammed Saeed, another activist who lives in the Damascus suburb of Douma, said “the explosions were so strong that earth shook under us.” He said the smell of the fire caused by the air raid near Qasioun was noticeable kilometres away.

Hezbollah fired thousands of rockets at Israel during the 2006 war, while Israeli warplanes destroyed large areas of southern and eastern Lebanon.
Emergency meeting held

Israeli media reported that Netanyahu also was holding an emergency meeting of his inner Security Cabinet. The prime minister’s office declined comment.

Amos Yadlin, a former head of Israel’s military intelligence, said the strikes on Syria are a signal to Damascus’s ally, Tehran, that Israel is serious about the red lines it has set.

Canada's foreign ministry

"We believe Israel has every right to defend itself and its people from terrorist threats. [Bashar] Assad continues his attempts to drag the entire region into his internal struggle to cling to power. Syria’s weapons are a concern to the entire international community."

-Rick Roth, press secretary for Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird

“Syria is a very important part in the front that Iran has built. Iran is testing Israel and the U.S. determination in the facing of red lines and what it sees is... at least some of the players, when they define red lines and they are crossed, take it seriously,” he told Army Radio.

In Tehran, Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast condemned the airstrikes and urged countries in the region to remain united against Israel, according to the semi-official Fars news agency.

Iranian defence minister Gen. Ahmad Vahidi was quoted by the official IRNA news agency as claiming the attacks show a growing alliance of convenience between the Syrian opposition and Israel.

'We must remember that the Syrian system is falling apart and Iran and Hezbollah are involved up to their necks in Syria helping Bashar Assad.'—Shaul Mofaz, former Israeli defence minister

“These vain moves are not a sign of Israel’s power,” he said. “It rather shows the (Israeli) regime’s despair in the face of regional developments.”

Iran has provided both financial and military support to Hezbollah for decades, and has used Syria as a conduit for both. If Assad were to fall, that pipeline could be cut, dealing a serious blow to Hezbollah’s ability to confront Israel.

The Fateh-110, or “Conqueror” in Farsi, is a short-range ballistic missile developed by Iran and first put into service in 2002. The Islamic Republic unveiled an upgraded version in 2012 that improved the weapon’s accuracy and increased its range to 300 kilometres.

Vahidi said at the time that the solid-fuelled missile could strike with pinpoint precision, making it the most accurate weapon of its kind in Iran’s arsenal.

An Israeli airstrike in January also targeted weapons apparently bound for Hezbollah, Israeli and U.S. officials have said. The White House had no immediate comment on Sunday’s reported missile strikes.
Details of airstrike unclear

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, an activist group, also reported large explosions in the area of Jamraya, a military and scientific research facility northwest of Damascus, about 15 kilometres from the Lebanese border.

Hezbollah’s Al-Manar TV said the research centre in Jamraya was not hit, but instead an army supply facility that produced food products for the military. It quoted unnamed Syrian security officials as saying that three sites including military barracks, arms depots and air defence centre were targeted by the strike.

The station aired footage of what it said was the Jamraya facility hit in the strike. It showed a heavily damaged building as well as what appeared to be a chicken farm with some chickens pecking around in debris scattered with dead birds.

The raid appeared to have taken place next to a major road that was filled with debris, and shell casings were strewn on the ground. A blue street sign on the side of the road referred to the direction of the Lebanon border and the Syrian town of Zabadani near the frontier.

Lebanon’s Al-Mayadeen TV, which has several reporters around Syria, said one of the strikes targeted a military position in the village of Saboura, west of Damascus and about 10 kilometres from the Lebanon border.

An amateur video said to be shot early Sunday in the Damascus area showed fire lighting up the night sky. The video appeared genuine and corresponded to other AP reporting.

Uzi Rubin, a missile expert and former Defence Ministry official, told the AP that if the target were Fateh-110 missiles as reported then it is a game changer as they put almost all Israel in range and can accurately hit targets.

Rubin emphasized that he was speaking as a rocket expert and had no details on reported strikes.

“If fired from southern Lebanon they can reach Tel Aviv and even [the southern city of] Beersheba.” He said the rockets are five times more accurate than the scud missiles that Hezbollah has fired in the past.

“It is a game changer because they are a threat to Israel’s infrastructure and military installations,” he said.

Israel’s first airstrike in Syria, in January, also struck Jamraya.

At the time, a U.S. official said Israel targeted trucks next to the research center that carried SA-17 anti-aircraft missiles. The strikes hit both the trucks and the research facility, the official said. The Syrian military didn’t confirm a hit on a weapons shipment at the time, saying only that Israeli warplanes bombed the research centre.

Israeli lawmaker Shaul Mofaz, a former defence minister and a former chief of staff, declined to confirm the airstrike but said Israel is concerned about weapons falling into the hands of the Islamic militant group amid the chaos of Syria’s civil war.

“We must remember that the Syrian system is falling apart and Iran and Hezbollah are involved up to their necks in Syria helping Bashar Assad,” he told Israel Radio. “There are dangers of weapons trickling to the Hezbollah and chemical weapons trickling to irresponsible groups like al-Qaeda.”

Pelloki on ghosts wrote:Just start masturbating furiously. That'll make them go away.
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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Fatal Exception » Mon May 06, 2013 11:11 am

BBC tries to pass off a picture from Iraq as being from Syria :

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvan ... sacre.html

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PostRe: We'll be in Syria any day now...
by Qikz » Mon May 06, 2013 11:26 am

Fatal Exception wrote:BBC tries to pass off a picture from Iraq as being from Syria :

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvan ... sacre.html


Are people surprised by this? The news does gooseberry fool like this all the time with Palestine.

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