Where Mario Kart Went Wrong

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Suffocate Peon
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PostWhere Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Suffocate Peon » Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:44 pm

Double Dash marked the change in the series. Shigeru Miyamoto wouldn't accept that just another Mario Kart could be released, he gave the impression through quotes that he wasn't satisfied with bigger and better, it had to fundamentally change the core gameplay which hadn't changed from Super Mario Kart in 92 to Diddy Kong Racing in 97. It was now 2002. They came up with the two character per kart idea, alternating between special power ups. This meant changing the karts, making them more like prams really. It didn't change the gameplay, it added nothing. But it chipped away at one of the previous fundamentals that the karts are neutral and plain, and it's funny to see oversized Bowser try to squeeze into one. That the courses and characters bring the personality. So Miyamoto didn't think Rare's innovations they brought to the genre were inspiring enough to be pushed further. In particular the adventure mode featuring themed zones on an island you're free to explore with boss races along the way. The overall effect of DKR was one of a kart racing game that moved beyond karts, but it did so in a way that was natural and elegant. The planes and hovercraft were a natural extension of Rare's pursuit of neat ideas, it felt right and made sense. Like, you've got a level in a volcano, why not fly through it, there's lush beaches and islands why not race on water (second best water effects after Wave Race64). It was 5 years on since DKR and Miyamoto wasn't interested in little additions, he naturally digs deeper, focusses on the mechanics. The idea in DKR of being able to upgrade the offensive or defensive weapon you're holding on to by re-picking it up as you race is probably the closest thing that comes to a Nintendo-esque idea. It doesn't shape the gameplay for instance like the boost/energy dynamic in F-Zero but it's neat. DKR represents a period not too distanced from the birth of the genre yet not on so advanced hardware meaning they had more power than they knew what to do with, so couldn't just over stuff the courses, so it allowed them to get the right balance between where to innovate and where to retain the formula. Nintendo with Double Dash decided the 4 races per cup template was fine, and to widen the genre and create something with longevity, magic and surprise wasn't worthwhile or inspiring.

Another thing about Double Dash was it was slow, and yeah but was it? I don't think the series has changed at all since, where the course seems to be preloaded before you race, so unlike Mario Kart 64 (and the majority of the best N64 racers) where the course was more narrow and long and popped up and scenery flew past you, now you're sort of just cruising. Trapped in a nightmare of cruising. You can't escape it. There is no sensation of speed in Mario Kart since Double Dash. Every second i think; this is a waste of time.

With Double Dash onwards you've got Miyamoto's purely gameplay driven desire to evolve, and then you've got Nintendo's desire under Satoru Iwata's leadership to attach the game to a hardware device they can use to sell to a mainstream audience. There's a consumerist materialistic slant to how Nintendo have used the extra power to just add more stuff. First came the bikes, the hanglider which offers nothing except to slow the game down, the anti gravity - games have always included more stuff as part of the price of purchase, but okay so you're given a wheel, the tracks are so wide as to be pointless, but what marks peak Mario Kart death is setting a course inside a shopping mall. Mario Kart ties into the perception Nintendo were trying to project. The Wii being the family console for everyone, the adverts were of a happy middle class family. Well of course they were that's how adverts work, yeah. We'd moved away from adverts of teenage boys in their darkened room, clutching the sofa for dear life, hair blown back ala Millhouse in The Simpsons.

By Mario Kart 8 people think the tracks are inventive because they twist and turn, but they're still wide, and deliberately short, and created in such a way you aren't racing through them but being given a guided tour of how excessively stuff packed a kart racing game can get. We've come a long way from Extreme G reflecting underground, alternative culture, with its grimey colour palette of rough browns and purples on black. The inspiration for the Wipeout of the 00s is Dubai, every track is like a soulless futuristic metropolis. You're not feeling the same isolation as when racing through the angular polygon mountains of what felt like an alien planet in 1995. Mario Kart was never grimey, no, but technology at least defined its design as largely abstract and reduced everything to shape.

I mean of course Nintendo are trying to broaden the appeal of Mario Kart, but the bikes with doable stunts, the hanglider, they were the additions of the desperate tacky kind a copy cat kart racer would go for. They surprised me at the time because they lacked class and quality. I love the first Mario Party, and i don't mind how the series caters to the general audience but with Mario Kart it's different. There's a big difference to how Nintendo have handled Mario Kart and how HAL have handled Smash Bros. I think the first game on the N64 was intended to be the mario kart of the fighting genre, it was never meant to appeal to the hardcore audience. But by Smash Bros Melee and the vast increase in speed, and the competitions that were taking place, it kind of leant that way. I think Melee is a massive success at taking from Nintendo's rich creative history and spinning it into new levels, new items, new characters, and I've always thought; is this chaotic multiple platform fighting game just a better fit to do this in comparison to a kart racing game, or is it just about the approach? How do you apply Pokeballs to Mario Kart when in Smash Bros a Pokemon can just sit on a platform, fire projectiles for 15 seconds then disappear? The F-Zero levels in Smash Bros are so inspired, jumping from one craft to another left to right, the other one where you're sat on the track face-on, with a platform above to leap to avoid the crafts racing through. The F-Zero tracks in Mario Kart feel like - and why wouldn't they, if offered as a DLC - like excessively glossy but entirely soulless new levels with zero link between the two games. And worse, continue the current Wipeout visual trend of being more like a futuristic Dubai, there's a fuckton of visual gloss happening with zero sense of speed or excitement. I mean it's also extra galling that Nintendo would bring F-Zero back from the dead yet bastardize it in such a way, i think they know what makes F-Zero unique (might be the speed) but are happy to tease its fans.

Smash Bros Melee massively expanded the single player with so many challenging interesting fun additions, they really rinsed what you can do with a fighting game of its type. It is perfect, and worthy of saying 'I don't know where else they can go with this series', Mario Kart isn't.

To say Nintendo is 'ultra corporate' is to be explained by their refusal to make a new F Zero. I'm not a raving fanboy who wants to be fed the same stuff, the point is these are genres and a developer needs to identity the essence and be creative within in it. But F Zero never sold well enough. So growth trumps any internal desire from the talent they have to explore more the genres they practically invented. This is the monumental disappointment at the heart of Nintendo that's not changed over the last 15 years. Hiroshi Yamauchi didn't play videogames, he wasn't involved, didn't care. I don't think under Satoru Iwata Nintendo would have got to the point of developing new ip like Metroid, F-Zero or producing Majora's Mask. His more direct involvement meant to relentlessly view every creative decision through the ways in which it expands Nintendo's very broad mass appeal. If Nintendo cared about videogames they'd pursue games creatively that aren't so general, but wouldn't sell anyway near as much. The reason I think this shows a lack of confidence is because they're defining their existence by their sales. Of course! You say. They're a business. They've said that when F-Zero GX didn't sell well it was their failure, it's not an acceptance that perhaps it's okay if only 200,000 people love your game. Their reason to exist is to make money. I think their reason to exist is to pursue the possibilities of videogames, and purely make money to allow them to do this.

What would I like the series to do? Firstly, stop viewing it in purely business terms. Secondly, start again, rediscover the essence. Get rid of the excessive fluff. Have trust in the genre. Re establish the fundamentals. Go back to boring small standard karts, reduce the character roster so each racer remains distinct. Decrease the width of the tracks, extend the length of the courses, increase the tight corners, chicanes. Get rid of the hanglider, the bikes, anti gravity. Increase the pace. Create tracks which aren't excessively stuff populated mini worlds that fly a camera over its entirety pre-race then plop you down. Create tracks that feel over the course of one lap you've actually travelled a distance. Increase the shortcuts, radically transform the track in lap two. Be more abstract and playful rather than literal with the use of graphics. Think of themes for tracks not based on our construction of the world. So shopping malls, tourist parks, cities, shipyards should go. Ones based on nature should be more surreal. Mount Wario as a boring ski resort? No. Aren't Wario games kind of mental? Smash Bros would set a level inside Wario Ware and it'd be crazy imaginative. With Mario Kart they're avoiding it. The best compliment that can be paid to Smash Bros Melee, and the games after is that they match the kind of creativity seen in the user created tracks of Trials Evolution, who reduce the rider and world to silhouette, who have tracks being drawn as you stunt your way through, you have tracks that flip and rotate from off the screen as you approach. They've found a way to strawberry float with the template in 2D, but Nintendo haven't in 3D. There's no similar anarchic spirit, the course creators have been given more power, littered the backgrounds with more stuff and slightly twisted the courses. There's no real interaction there, in the same way a track materializing in front of you gives a thrill where anything feels possible. There's a difference between user created tracks and the ones created by the actual developers in Trials, even if they end up hiring some of the talent, and it's that the passionate amateur is messing around for his own amusement and the need to make logical sense of his creativity to be sold as A Product is not there. There's no professionalism, it's just pure expression, and really evident in the use of abstraction, the twists and turns their attempts take. It can't be rationally defined, you just sense it.

In current Mario Kart, their updated version of Bowser's Castle has him fully realised built large and on fire punching the track as you pass, a feature in the pre race reveal, and it would be cool if it wasn't just the predictable progression you expect. It makes sense to think of current Mario Kart as having nowhere to go because it's just increased the graphic approach without doing anything more.

Get rid of the tacky item boxes and jump boost strips. They won't do this but I'd prefer floating brown brick boxes, and basically all reduction of any glitz and gloss. Always have hated the ? boxes in MK64. Create an adventure mode, surprise people through it. In Diddy Kong Racing, you finish the dino world, the ice world, the forest tracks, you race the dragon etc, then fly off to space. As a child what could be more exciting? As an adult what could be more exciting? Create more types of battle modes, DKR has the egg stealing one in the volcano that isn't based on merely attacking eachother, have boss races, have specific challenges. None of this is interesting is it? Except how they could do it. I always liked survival modes, racing up a seemingly endless mountain, with a ridley swooping down, miniature figurines falling from the sky blocking your view. Have a course inside a monster's intestines that you race around infinitely until you all fire at each other enough you pierce open his skin and continue the race outside, except it's not a monster, and the outside is the operating table of an operating room, and Luigi is giving Mario his kidney.

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Squinty
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Squinty » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:26 pm

Blue shells. Nuff said.

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Jezo
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Jezo » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:49 pm

I started skipping through when you said the new mechanics in Double Dash didn't change the gameplay. That's just straight up wrong.

I do agree however on the Smash comparison. I loved Mario Kart DS's mission mode, it was a new single player experience that I don't understand why they never brought it back. The addition of bikes is cool, but it's not Mario Kart & Bikes, though it does add some slightly new mechanics a la wheelies in Wii and inward drifting. Otherwise on the whole I would agree with you that recent additions to the series are rather tacked on, but I feel 8 Deluxe is one of the most solid entries in the series if not the best, so I can't really complain.

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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by IAmTheSaladMan » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:50 pm

Double Dash was my first Mario Kart so I had nothing to compare it to and as such I loved it.

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Suffocate Peon
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Suffocate Peon » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:07 pm

Jezo wrote:I started skipping through when you said the new mechanics in Double Dash didn't change the gameplay. That's just straight up wrong.


How?

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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by SMPL » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:12 pm

Double Dash is still the best for me. It has the best handling in the series, good courses and having two characters works well - all of the specials are reasonably balanced. Best battle mode.

The Wii entry had terrible handling, a worse aesthetic and I don't think the courses were any better. The introduction of bikes seemed unnecessary and the Wii motion steering wheel was a bit gimmicky. It's still a fun game but was worse than DD in every way imo.

MK8 is better than the Wii entry but I agree the courses are too wide and not that engaging. Not a fan of the anti-gravity or coins scattered about the track, and it's just too busy in general. Most of the retro tracks they included are worse than the originals (Baby Park, SNES Rainbow Road, Toad's Turnpike). Should've never got rid of fake item boxes either. Plus the battle mode is a complete mess.

The SNES/GBA and N64 entries are good but show their age a bit. Still, I'd put them above MK8/Wii.

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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Fabong » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:22 pm

Suffocate Peon wrote:whole post


I see.

Last edited by Green Gecko on Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: wall of text lulz
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by FudgeDiver » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:23 pm

Fabong wrote:I see.


What would you add to the discussion

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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Fabong » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:25 pm

FudgeDiver wrote:
Fabong wrote:
Suffocate Peon wrote:Double Dash marked the change in the series. Shigeru Miyamoto wouldn't accept that just another Mario Kart could be released, he gave the impression through quotes that he wasn't satisfied with bigger and better, it had to fundamentally change the core gameplay which hadn't changed from Super Mario Kart in 92 to Diddy Kong Racing in 97. It was now 2002. They came up with the two character per kart idea, alternating between special power ups. This meant changing the karts, making them more like prams really. It didn't change the gameplay, it added nothing. But it chipped away at one of the previous fundamentals that the karts are neutral and plain, and it's funny to see oversized Bowser try to squeeze into one. That the courses and characters bring the personality. So Miyamoto didn't think Rare's innovations they brought to the genre were inspiring enough to be pushed further. In particular the adventure mode featuring themed zones on an island you're free to explore with boss races along the way. The overall effect of DKR was one of a kart racing game that moved beyond karts, but it did so in a way that was natural and elegant. The planes and hovercraft were a natural extension of Rare's pursuit of neat ideas, it felt right and made sense. Like, you've got a level in a volcano, why not fly through it, there's lush beaches and islands why not race on water (second best water effects after Wave Race64). It was 5 years on since DKR and Miyamoto wasn't interested in little additions, he naturally digs deeper, focusses on the mechanics. The idea in DKR of being able to upgrade the offensive or defensive weapon you're holding on to by re-picking it up as you race is probably the closest thing that comes to a Nintendo-esque idea. It doesn't shape the gameplay for instance like the boost/energy dynamic in F-Zero but it's neat. DKR represents a period not too distanced from the birth of the genre yet not on so advanced hardware meaning they had more power than they knew what to do with, so couldn't just over stuff the courses, so it allowed them to get the right balance between where to innovate and where to retain the formula. Nintendo with Double Dash decided the 4 races per cup template was fine, and to widen the genre and create something with longevity, magic and surprise wasn't worthwhile or inspiring.

Another thing about Double Dash was it was slow, and yeah but was it? I don't think the series has changed at all since, where the course seems to be preloaded before you race, so unlike Mario Kart 64 (and the majority of the best N64 racers) where the course was more narrow and long and popped up and scenery flew past you, now you're sort of just cruising. Trapped in a nightmare of cruising. You can't escape it. There is no sensation of speed in Mario Kart since Double Dash. Every second i think; this is a waste of time.

With Double Dash onwards you've got Miyamoto's purely gameplay driven desire to evolve, and then you've got Nintendo's desire under Satoru Iwata's leadership to attach the game to a hardware device they can use to sell to a mainstream audience. There's a consumerist materialistic slant to how Nintendo have used the extra power to just add more stuff. First came the bikes, the hanglider which offers nothing except to slow the game down, the anti gravity - games have always included more stuff as part of the price of purchase, but okay so you're given a wheel, the tracks are so wide as to be pointless, but what marks peak Mario Kart death is setting a course inside a shopping mall. Mario Kart ties into the perception Nintendo were trying to project. The Wii being the family console for everyone, the adverts were of a happy middle class family. Well of course they were that's how adverts work, yeah. We'd moved away from adverts of teenage boys in their darkened room, clutching the sofa for dear life, hair blown back ala Millhouse in The Simpsons.

By Mario Kart 8 people think the tracks are inventive because they twist and turn, but they're still wide, and deliberately short, and created in such a way you aren't racing through them but being given a guided tour of how excessively stuff packed a kart racing game can get. We've come a long way from Extreme G reflecting underground, alternative culture, with its grimey colour palette of rough browns and purples on black. The inspiration for the Wipeout of the 00s is Dubai, every track is like a soulless futuristic metropolis. You're not feeling the same isolation as when racing through the angular polygon mountains of what felt like an alien planet in 1995. Mario Kart was never grimey, no, but technology at least defined its design as largely abstract and reduced everything to shape.

I mean of course Nintendo are trying to broaden the appeal of Mario Kart, but the bikes with doable stunts, the hanglider, they were the additions of the desperate tacky kind a copy cat kart racer would go for. They surprised me at the time because they lacked class and quality. I love the first Mario Party, and i don't mind how the series caters to the general audience but with Mario Kart it's different. There's a big difference to how Nintendo have handled Mario Kart and how HAL have handled Smash Bros. I think the first game on the N64 was intended to be the mario kart of the fighting genre, it was never meant to appeal to the hardcore audience. But by Smash Bros Melee and the vast increase in speed, and the competitions that were taking place, it kind of leant that way. I think Melee is a massive success at taking from Nintendo's rich creative history and spinning it into new levels, new items, new characters, and I've always thought; is this chaotic multiple platform fighting game just a better fit to do this in comparison to a kart racing game, or is it just about the approach? How do you apply Pokeballs to Mario Kart when in Smash Bros a Pokemon can just sit on a platform, fire projectiles for 15 seconds then disappear? The F-Zero levels in Smash Bros are so inspired, jumping from one craft to another left to right, the other one where you're sat on the track face-on, with a platform above to leap to avoid the crafts racing through. The F-Zero tracks in Mario Kart feel like - and why wouldn't they, if offered as a DLC - like excessively glossy but entirely soulless new levels with zero link between the two games. And worse, continue the current Wipeout visual trend of being more like a futuristic Dubai, there's a fuckton of visual gloss happening with zero sense of speed or excitement. I mean it's also extra galling that Nintendo would bring F-Zero back from the dead yet bastardize it in such a way, i think they know what makes F-Zero unique (might be the speed) but are happy to tease its fans.

Smash Bros Melee massively expanded the single player with so many challenging interesting fun additions, they really rinsed what you can do with a fighting game of its type. It is perfect, and worthy of saying 'I don't know where else they can go with this series', Mario Kart isn't.

To say Nintendo is 'ultra corporate' is to be explained by their refusal to make a new F Zero. I'm not a raving fanboy who wants to be fed the same stuff, the point is these are genres and a developer needs to identity the essence and be creative within in it. But F Zero never sold well enough. So growth trumps any internal desire from the talent they have to explore more the genres they practically invented. This is the monumental disappointment at the heart of Nintendo that's not changed over the last 15 years. Hiroshi Yamauchi didn't play videogames, he wasn't involved, didn't care. I don't think under Satoru Iwata Nintendo would have got to the point of developing new ip like Metroid, F-Zero or producing Majora's Mask. His more direct involvement meant to relentlessly view every creative decision through the ways in which it expands Nintendo's very broad mass appeal. If Nintendo cared about videogames they'd pursue games creatively that aren't so general, but wouldn't sell anyway near as much. The reason I think this shows a lack of confidence is because they're defining their existence by their sales. Of course! You say. They're a business. They've said that when F-Zero GX didn't sell well it was their failure, it's not an acceptance that perhaps it's okay if only 200,000 people love your game. Their reason to exist is to make money. I think their reason to exist is to pursue the possibilities of videogames, and purely make money to allow them to do this.

What would I like the series to do? Firstly, stop viewing it in purely business terms. Secondly, start again, rediscover the essence. Get rid of the excessive fluff. Have trust in the genre. Re establish the fundamentals. Go back to boring small standard karts, reduce the character roster so each racer remains distinct. Decrease the width of the tracks, extend the length of the courses, increase the tight corners, chicanes. Get rid of the hanglider, the bikes, anti gravity. Increase the pace. Create tracks which aren't excessively stuff populated mini worlds that fly a camera over its entirety pre-race then plop you down. Create tracks that feel over the course of one lap you've actually travelled a distance. Increase the shortcuts, radically transform the track in lap two. Be more abstract and playful rather than literal with the use of graphics. Think of themes for tracks not based on our construction of the world. So shopping malls, tourist parks, cities, shipyards should go. Ones based on nature should be more surreal. Mount Wario as a boring ski resort? No. Aren't Wario games kind of mental? Smash Bros would set a level inside Wario Ware and it'd be crazy imaginative. With Mario Kart they're avoiding it. The best compliment that can be paid to Smash Bros Melee, and the games after is that they match the kind of creativity seen in the user created tracks of Trials Evolution, who reduce the rider and world to silhouette, who have tracks being drawn as you stunt your way through, you have tracks that flip and rotate from off the screen as you approach. They've found a way to strawberry float with the template in 2D, but Nintendo haven't in 3D. There's no similar anarchic spirit, the course creators have been given more power, littered the backgrounds with more stuff and slightly twisted the courses. There's no real interaction there, in the same way a track materializing in front of you gives a thrill where anything feels possible. There's a difference between user created tracks and the ones created by the actual developers in Trials, even if they end up hiring some of the talent, and it's that the passionate amateur is messing around for his own amusement and the need to make logical sense of his creativity to be sold as A Product is not there. There's no professionalism, it's just pure expression, and really evident in the use of abstraction, the twists and turns their attempts take. It can't be rationally defined, you just sense it.

In current Mario Kart, their updated version of Bowser's Castle has him fully realised built large and on fire punching the track as you pass, a feature in the pre race reveal, and it would be cool if it wasn't just the predictable progression you expect. It makes sense to think of current Mario Kart as having nowhere to go because it's just increased the graphic approach without doing anything more.

Get rid of the tacky item boxes and jump boost strips. They won't do this but I'd prefer floating brown brick boxes, and basically all reduction of any glitz and gloss. Always have hated the ? boxes in MK64. Create an adventure mode, surprise people through it. In Diddy Kong Racing, you finish the dino world, the ice world, the forest tracks, you race the dragon etc, then fly off to space. As a child what could be more exciting? As an adult what could be more exciting? Create more types of battle modes, DKR has the egg stealing one in the volcano that isn't based on merely attacking eachother, have boss races, have specific challenges. None of this is interesting is it? Except how they could do it. I always liked survival modes, racing up a seemingly endless mountain, with a ridley swooping down, miniature figurines falling from the sky blocking your view. Have a course inside a monster's intestines that you race around infinitely until you all fire at each other enough you pierce open his skin and continue the race outside, except it's not a monster, and the outside is the operating table of an operating room, and Luigi is giving Mario his kidney.


I see.


What would you add to the discussion


If FudgeDiver played Mario Kart, he'd be FudgeDriver

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FudgeDiver
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by FudgeDiver » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:29 pm

Fabong wrote:If FudgeDiver played Mario Kart, he'd be FudgeDriver


incorrect i'd be donkey kong

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Ironhide
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Ironhide » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:33 pm

The only Mario Karts I've played are Super Circuit, MK64, Double Dash and the DS one.

Of those Double Dash is by far the worst, and MK64 is the 2ne worst.

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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Vermilion » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:41 pm

I really enjoyed Double Dash, for me it was Mario Kart Wii that spoiled things.

The addition of bikes, tricks, new tracks which sucked, along with too many old ones meant it was the first time i ever grew to dislike an MK game.

On a side note, while i initially liked Diddy Kong Racing, it eventually became ridiculously difficult. The handling of the vehicles alone contributed to that difficulty while the silver coin challenges and cheating AI meant i gave up long before the first wizpig race.

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Suffocate Peon
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Suffocate Peon » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:42 pm

I don't think of a 'best', MK64 is my favourite but I didn't have a SNES so didn't play the original much.

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FudgeDiver
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by FudgeDiver » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:46 pm

DS is only disliked by people who can't handle the snaking

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Fabong
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Fabong » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:46 pm

FudgeDiver wrote:incorrect i'd be donkey kong

Diver Kong

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FudgeDiver
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by FudgeDiver » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:47 pm

Fabong wrote:Diver Kong

no that's his cousin

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Vermilion
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Vermilion » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:50 pm

FudgeDiver wrote:DS is only disliked by people who can't handle the snaking


To be fair, snaking did ruin the online matches.

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Dig Dug
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Dig Dug » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:51 pm

Is this a copypasta?

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Fabong
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Fabong » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:52 pm

Dig Dug wrote:Is this a copypasta?


Are you a professional idiot or just a gifted amateur

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Buffalo
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PostRe: Where Mario Kart Went Wrong
by Buffalo » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:59 pm

Can you stop please?

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