Brexit Thread 2

Fed up talking videogames? Why?

How would you vote if we had to vote again?

Leave
9
6%
Remain
131
94%
 
Total votes: 140
User avatar
DML
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by DML » Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:44 pm

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
DML wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
DML wrote:So much bluster.

Heres whats going to happen.

Mays deal fails, and she doesn't get to go back to the EU for whatever reason.
Government takes control.
They do for a Norway deal, the EU says no.
The courts uphold that the UK can't crash out on No Deal.
Leaving only an election or a referendum.

Unless something extroidinary happens, I can't see how else it can go down. A leadership change won't change anything, because a Brexiteer PM is even LESS likely to get parliament to sign a deal, and they will prevent a no deal. Its up to the Conservatives whether they want to collapse or end up triggering a second referendum. I personally think they will take the former route, but Labour are only flip flopping because they think Norway is still a possibility, and very soon it will be totally off the table when the EU know that they cannot no deal!

Roll on May's defeat. So much listening to people like Boris etc who right now couldnt be more irrelevant. What is interesting is May, the whips, the DUP and Labour.


Norway cannot happen unless we accept free movement. The Tories are never going to flip around to saying we should accept it, they’ve been banging the “immigration is too high!” drum for a long long time now.

I think an election is far more likely than a referendum, the Tories cannot push for another referendum after all the recent rhetoric. Labour might go for it, but they’d still need to win an election. And then we’d have to win the referendum if Labour called it.

And the clock is ticking, no deal doesn’t need anybody to go for it, it just needs Parliament to be unable to agree.


If they legally can't leave on No Deal, the clock is kinda irrelevant. We are guaranteed a can-kick/withdrawal of Article 50 before that regardless.

Also, the Tories no longer really control these negotiations. It doesn't matter what the Tory stance was as much now, they won't be fully controlling negotiations.

Thats not cheery eyed optimism, thats the reality of the situation. The big unknown factor is the Labour Party, what will they actually push for when they hold the cards? They could be equally as useless, we'll just have to see.

The one thing I feel is 95% certain at this point is No Deal is dead, even if everyone fails to agree something. Its not helpful to keep pushing that, because I just don't think thats the new reality of the situation. Its fun to talk of a ticking time bomb, but that's whats going to push one of the other options (welection, can kick, referndum) into action and not be the cause of an auto-no deal.


You can’t legally leave on no deal? You also can’t have a deal without people agreeing to a deal. And any legal situation can be changed by Parliament.

No deal is far from dead and it’s not even completely in Parliament’s hands. If Parliament can’t agree a deal, then it’s no deal. If the EU reject Parliaments ideas for a deal, then it’s no deal.

No deal can happen unless Parliament agrees. If Parliament doesn’t agree a deal then the only option (assuming we leave) is no deal or an extension on Article 50 (if the EU agree).


They will agree to anything before no deal.

Image
User avatar
Rex Kramer
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Rex Kramer » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:19 pm

ITV have canned their Brexit debate as well. I guess there really is no point if at least one of the participants might be out of a job by then.

User avatar
captain red dog
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Bristol, UK

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by captain red dog » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:22 pm

It's utterly pointless anyway. Nothing May can do will get this through parliament and this debate was a weak attempt to try and swing the public on side. Corbyn should have told her to get strawberry floated from the start after she ducked the GE debates.

This is a matter for parliament and then hopefully pushed back to the people.

User avatar
Return_of_the_STAR
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Northampton

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Return_of_the_STAR » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:02 pm

Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.

Image

GRAPL Heavyweight Champion 2010, Runner Up 2017, tag team Champion 2011, 2015, Wrestlemania PPV Winner 2012 and your current all time highest GRAPL points scorer.
Fixture feeling champion 2013.

I'm a Paul Heyman guy!
User avatar
Partridge Iciclebubbles
"Special"
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:17 pm

Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.

User avatar
Garth of Christmas Future
Emeritus
Joined in 2008
Location: Norn Iron

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Garth of Christmas Future » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:46 pm

Theresa May’s Team Has Discussed A Second Referendum Or A Softer Brexit If Her Deal Is Killed Next Week

Some of Theresa May’s Downing Street advisers have urged her to consider a second referendum while others have argued for a softer Brexit, BuzzFeed News has learned, as splits emerge in the prime minister’s top team on how to respond in the likely event that her deal is rejected by MPs next week.

Number 10 has insisted there is no plan B if May’s deal fails, but as Westminster counts down to Tuesday’s meaningful vote on the withdrawal agreement, conversations have taken place between the PM and her closest aides about how she could proceed if it is voted down.

BuzzFeed News understands that several of the PM’s senior allies have raised the prospect of another referendum, with voters offered a choice between her deal and remaining in the EU. Those sympathetic to the idea believe she could win by guaranteeing an end to free movement and have said it is the only way she will be able to secure a mandate for her exit plan.

A source familiar with the conversations said May’s chief of staff Gavin Barwell and chief whip Julian Smith have discussed the merits of a second referendum.

But the source said May has vociferously opposed the idea of another public vote whenever it has been raised, because she believes it is her duty to fulfil the result of the 2016 referendum and cannot risk Brexit being reversed. “It is the only time she loses her temper and raises her voice,” they said. Downing Street declined to comment on private conversations.

The other option being discussed by May’s allies is softening the deal so she could win the backing of Conservative Remainers and Labour MPs in a second vote. Several cabinet ministers are pushing for a Norway-style plan B, with the UK remaining inside the single market.

It has previously been assumed that May would never countenance a Norway-style deal because it would mean continuing freedom of movement, which has been seen as a red line she will not cross. One of May’s closest aides told BuzzFeed News earlier this year that both he and the PM would resign rather than accept free movement.

But May’s doubts about a second referendum have led colleagues to believe she could seek a softer Brexit rather than risk no Brexit at all, even though she believes it would be a worse outcome than her deal. “As bad as EEA is, at least it’s leaving,” said a Whitehall source, referring to membership of the European Economic Area.

May has previously publicly ruled out both a Norway-style Brexit and a second referendum, and the catch-22 scenario has led both Leave and Remain Tories to conclude the PM has run out of road.

A Remain-voting cabinet minister is planning for an imminent leadership contest and has made offers of jobs to both prominent Remainers and Brexiteers.

If May loses Tuesday’s vote by a significant margin, Tory MPs on both the Leave and Remain sides expect her to either resign or face a leadership challenge.

Tory Leavers told BuzzFeed News that if she lost by a small margin, they would demand she goes back to Brussels and attempt to renegotiate the backstop arrangement. They said she would be ousted if she attempted to hold a second referendum or soften the deal.

A former cabinet minister said: “Theresa and this government had one job: to deliver the will of the people by delivering Brexit. If they fail to deliver on that, it’s not just game over for Theresa, it’s game over for the Tories. She either has to go back to Brussels and say no to the backstop or it’s no deal. Or, if she’s unwilling to do that, we need someone that will. Anything less, and the Tory party is finished.”

A second former minister said: “I’m not sure she can or should stay on after she loses the meaningful vote. She’s lost all power and all control. For two years she hasn’t listened to her party and so now they no longer listen to her. The fundamental problem is no one trusts her. If she stays, she continues to split the party.”

The view in cabinet is that, if May’s deal is rejected but she does stay on, a second referendum and a softer Brexit are her only two realistic options. Ministers have concluded that any attempt by May to renegotiate the backstop would fail, that a no-deal Brexit would cause mass cabinet resignations and be blocked by parliament, and that Tory MPs would prevent her from calling a general election.

Both a second referendum and a softer Brexit are looked upon grimly by May’s aides, who now fear they won’t be able to deliver on their promises to voters. “It has come to the point where you feel like you are in that Mitchell and Webb sketch when one of the Nazis looks at the other and asks, ‘Are we the baddies?’” said a Number 10 aide.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/alexwickham/ma ... rm=4ldqpgm

User avatar
Sleighamorph
Member ♥
Joined in 2010

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Sleighamorph » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:08 pm


Lagamorph's Underwater Photography Thread
Zellery wrote:Good post Lagamorph.
Turboman wrote:Lagomorph..... Is ..... Right
User avatar
KK
Moderator
Joined in 2008
Location: Botswana
Contact:

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by KK » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:56 pm

BBC just accused of anti-Brexit bias on QT by Telegraph columnist Charles Moore, saying the panel is once again made up of Remainers.

Image
User avatar
Garth of Christmas Future
Emeritus
Joined in 2008
Location: Norn Iron

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Garth of Christmas Future » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:56 pm


User avatar
Return_of_the_STAR
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Northampton

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Return_of_the_STAR » Fri Dec 07, 2018 12:12 am

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.


I don’t understand why it would cause a drop as large as that. Economic relationship wise we will be in the same situation as now.

Image

GRAPL Heavyweight Champion 2010, Runner Up 2017, tag team Champion 2011, 2015, Wrestlemania PPV Winner 2012 and your current all time highest GRAPL points scorer.
Fixture feeling champion 2013.

I'm a Paul Heyman guy!
User avatar
Partridge Iciclebubbles
"Special"
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:40 am

Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.


I don’t understand why it would cause a drop as large as that. Economic relationship wise we will be in the same situation as now.


We would still be in the single market, but we would lose the trade agreements that the EU has with other states around the world.

We could build up our own trade agreements with other nations, but there’s no guarantee we’d get as good a deal as we currently have. And we’d almost certainly not, we are a much smaller market than the EU and so have less power.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e ... 010_EN.pdf

It also doesn’t cover the Customs Union, which means the Irish border issue would not be solved.

https://www.politico.eu/article/soft-br ... -solution/

User avatar
Partridge Iciclebubbles
"Special"
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:49 am



:lol:

User avatar
Squinty
Member
Joined in 2009
Location: Norn Oirland

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Squinty » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:00 am

He's a strawberry floating lazy banana split who is fooling no one.

Found this video of all the lies. Thought it was pretty good.


User avatar
Harry Ola
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Harry Ola » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:00 am

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.


I don’t understand why it would cause a drop as large as that. Economic relationship wise we will be in the same situation as now.


We would still be in the single market, but we would lose the trade agreements that the EU has with other states around the world.

We could build up our own trade agreements with other nations, but there’s no guarantee we’d get as good a deal as we currently have. And we’d almost certainly not, we are a much smaller market than the EU and so have less power.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e ... 010_EN.pdf

It also doesn’t cover the Customs Union, which means the Irish border issue would not be solved.

https://www.politico.eu/article/soft-br ... -solution/


Would there also be the issue of financial passporting? This could heavily affect the financial sector which is currently a big chunk of GDP.

Image
User avatar
Sleighamorph
Member ♥
Joined in 2010

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Sleighamorph » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:03 am



People are sick and tired of medical experts anyway.

Lagamorph's Underwater Photography Thread
Zellery wrote:Good post Lagamorph.
Turboman wrote:Lagomorph..... Is ..... Right
User avatar
Partridge Iciclebubbles
"Special"
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:12 am

Harry Ola wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.


I don’t understand why it would cause a drop as large as that. Economic relationship wise we will be in the same situation as now.


We would still be in the single market, but we would lose the trade agreements that the EU has with other states around the world.

We could build up our own trade agreements with other nations, but there’s no guarantee we’d get as good a deal as we currently have. And we’d almost certainly not, we are a much smaller market than the EU and so have less power.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e ... 010_EN.pdf

It also doesn’t cover the Customs Union, which means the Irish border issue would not be solved.

https://www.politico.eu/article/soft-br ... -solution/


Would there also be the issue of financial passporting? This could heavily affect the financial sector which is currently a big chunk of GDP.


I think EEA/EFTA includes financial passporting but that might be an optional part of it. We'd obviously be mad not to go with financial passporting if we were to join EEA/EFTA, but we seem quite mad anyway so who knows. :lol:

User avatar
Return_of_the_STAR
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Northampton

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Return_of_the_STAR » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:37 am

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Harry Ola wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.


I don’t understand why it would cause a drop as large as that. Economic relationship wise we will be in the same situation as now.


We would still be in the single market, but we would lose the trade agreements that the EU has with other states around the world.

We could build up our own trade agreements with other nations, but there’s no guarantee we’d get as good a deal as we currently have. And we’d almost certainly not, we are a much smaller market than the EU and so have less power.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e ... 010_EN.pdf

It also doesn’t cover the Customs Union, which means the Irish border issue would not be solved.

https://www.politico.eu/article/soft-br ... -solution/


Would there also be the issue of financial passporting? This could heavily affect the financial sector which is currently a big chunk of GDP.


I think EEA/EFTA includes financial passporting but that might be an optional part of it. We'd obviously be mad not to go with financial passporting if we were to join EEA/EFTA, but we seem quite mad anyway so who knows. :lol:


Norway and Sweden seem to cope fine with their border. It works. They are always attempting to implement monitoring measures but they have even more shared roads and bridges than between N Ireland and Rep Ireland. The vast majority of them have no checks whatsoever going both ways. People and traffic travel both ways without issue. It would be no different for us between the UK and Ireland if we had the same membership as Norway. Anyway as I said it’s become a pointless topic as their seems to be no movement or political will towards this as our politicians want to be able to set our own rules and regulations. Norway just accepts the EUs regulations and moves on.

https://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/is-the-norway-sweden-border-a-model-for-uk-ireland/

Image

GRAPL Heavyweight Champion 2010, Runner Up 2017, tag team Champion 2011, 2015, Wrestlemania PPV Winner 2012 and your current all time highest GRAPL points scorer.
Fixture feeling champion 2013.

I'm a Paul Heyman guy!
User avatar
Partridge Iciclebubbles
"Special"
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Partridge Iciclebubbles » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:54 am

Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Harry Ola wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.


I don’t understand why it would cause a drop as large as that. Economic relationship wise we will be in the same situation as now.


We would still be in the single market, but we would lose the trade agreements that the EU has with other states around the world.

We could build up our own trade agreements with other nations, but there’s no guarantee we’d get as good a deal as we currently have. And we’d almost certainly not, we are a much smaller market than the EU and so have less power.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e ... 010_EN.pdf

It also doesn’t cover the Customs Union, which means the Irish border issue would not be solved.

https://www.politico.eu/article/soft-br ... -solution/


Would there also be the issue of financial passporting? This could heavily affect the financial sector which is currently a big chunk of GDP.


I think EEA/EFTA includes financial passporting but that might be an optional part of it. We'd obviously be mad not to go with financial passporting if we were to join EEA/EFTA, but we seem quite mad anyway so who knows. :lol:


Norway and Sweden seem to cope fine with their border. It works. They are always attempting to implement monitoring measures but they have even more shared roads and bridges than between N Ireland and Rep Ireland. The vast majority of them have no checks whatsoever going both ways. People and traffic travel both ways without issue. It would be no different for us between the UK and Ireland if we had the same membership as Norway. Anyway as I said it’s become a pointless topic as their seems to be no movement or political will towards this as our politicians want to be able to set our own rules and regulations. Norway just accepts the EUs regulations and moves on.

https://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/is-the-norway-sweden-border-a-model-for-uk-ireland/


Norway and Sweden are both part of Schengen.

Norway and Sweden don't have the Good Friday Agreement.

Norway and Sweden had almost 230k checks on vehicles in 2016 ( https://www.politico.eu/article/brexit- ... ay-sweden/ ).

User avatar
Rex Kramer
Member
Joined in 2008

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Rex Kramer » Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:20 am


User avatar
Return_of_the_STAR
Member
Joined in 2008
Location: Northampton

PostRe: Brexit Thread 2
by Return_of_the_STAR » Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:42 am

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Harry Ola wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:
Ho-Ho-Ho-tek wrote:
Return_of_the_STAR wrote:What I would have liked to have seen was the government just come out two years ago and say that when we leave the EU we will drop down to EFTA membership with EEA access for a period of time whilst we look to negotiate a new arrangement. Would that not have solved all the short term problems.

You may call that a 'short term' problem but it would be a catastrophic short term problem that would damage the UK economy in the long term.


I'm aware the short time future would be catastrophic which is why I said surely dropping down to EFTA and EEA would surely solve those economic issues. All the current arrangements would stay the same. The biggest problem I can see if having to listening to the inbreds complaining about how the will of the people have been ignored and shouting 'treason' etc.

Obviously that's never going to happen anyway.


Even EEA/EFTA membership is projected to cause a 1.4% drop in GDP. That’s roughly similar to the fall in GDP following the 2008 crash.


I don’t understand why it would cause a drop as large as that. Economic relationship wise we will be in the same situation as now.


We would still be in the single market, but we would lose the trade agreements that the EU has with other states around the world.

We could build up our own trade agreements with other nations, but there’s no guarantee we’d get as good a deal as we currently have. And we’d almost certainly not, we are a much smaller market than the EU and so have less power.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e ... 010_EN.pdf

It also doesn’t cover the Customs Union, which means the Irish border issue would not be solved.

https://www.politico.eu/article/soft-br ... -solution/


Would there also be the issue of financial passporting? This could heavily affect the financial sector which is currently a big chunk of GDP.


I think EEA/EFTA includes financial passporting but that might be an optional part of it. We'd obviously be mad not to go with financial passporting if we were to join EEA/EFTA, but we seem quite mad anyway so who knows. :lol:


Norway and Sweden seem to cope fine with their border. It works. They are always attempting to implement monitoring measures but they have even more shared roads and bridges than between N Ireland and Rep Ireland. The vast majority of them have no checks whatsoever going both ways. People and traffic travel both ways without issue. It would be no different for us between the UK and Ireland if we had the same membership as Norway. Anyway as I said it’s become a pointless topic as their seems to be no movement or political will towards this as our politicians want to be able to set our own rules and regulations. Norway just accepts the EUs regulations and moves on.

https://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/is-the-norway-sweden-border-a-model-for-uk-ireland/


Norway and Sweden are both part of Schengen.

Norway and Sweden don't have the Good Friday Agreement.

Norway and Sweden had almost 230k checks on vehicles in 2016 ( https://www.politico.eu/article/brexit- ... ay-sweden/ ).


Still no reason it wouldn’t work here.

Image

GRAPL Heavyweight Champion 2010, Runner Up 2017, tag team Champion 2011, 2015, Wrestlemania PPV Winner 2012 and your current all time highest GRAPL points scorer.
Fixture feeling champion 2013.

I'm a Paul Heyman guy!

Return to “Stuff”