any german speakers?

Fed up talking videogames? Why?
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Moggy
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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Moggy » Mon Jul 27, 2020 11:32 pm

rinks wrote:Image


I can't believe nobody else thought of that joke. :lol:

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by <]:^D » Mon Jul 27, 2020 11:33 pm

you got MCN on ignore Mogs?

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Somebody Else's Problem » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:29 am

:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

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Moggy
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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Moggy » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:43 am

Who?

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Somebody Else's Problem » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:49 am

Moggy ist ein stinkender Schwachkopf

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Moggy
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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Moggy » Tue Jul 28, 2020 7:12 am

Somebody Else's Problem wrote:Moggy ist ein stinkender Schwachkopf


Oh vous! :wub:

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RichardUK
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PostRe: any german speakers?
by RichardUK » Wed Jul 29, 2020 2:15 am

I speak pretty good German (although obviously when abroad it’s easier just to speak English but more spaced out and loudly, the locals love that approach ;) ) after falling in love with Bavaria after visiting Munich when I was a teenager, after that I spent a lot of time there and even purchased a house, I even did a dna test and found that I am British 89% and German 11% with ancestry if the same area (Bavaria) that I love so much so it was meant to be!

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Oblomov Boblomov
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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Oblomov Boblomov » Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:39 am

RichardUK wrote:I speak pretty good German (although obviously when abroad it’s easier just to speak English but more spaced out and loudly, the locals love that approach ;) ) after falling in love with Bavaria after visiting Munich when I was a teenager, after that I spent a lot of time there and even purchased a house, I even did a dna test and found that I am British 89% and German 11% with ancestry if the same area (Bavaria) that I love so much so it was meant to be!

It must have been a confusing time for you when you beat part of yourself in two World Wars and one World Cup.

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by caseinpoint » Wed Jul 29, 2020 2:51 pm

German is pretty rough in this respect, but it all boils down to some rules that you just have to learn.
There's a couple of levels of stuff going on.

- 1st is the gender (like a bunch of other languages, except German has neuter too for 4 total - m/f/n/pl)
- 2nd is the case (there are also 4 of these - which show the role of things within a sentence)

This gives a nice summary of the various 'thes' that you end up with when combining these two;
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_grammar#/media/File:German_die_der_das_declensions.svg
You have the same for 'a' as well.

It gets more complicated still, because the adjectives and nouns (endings) also change depending on how many you have and what role they take up in the sentence. Also certain verbs determine certain cases based on motion etc (just have to learn this).

So some concrete examples;

CASE 1 - NOMINATIVE aka is the subject (does the action)

The woman is feminine, so is 'die'.
The woman (Die Frau)

The women is plural, so is also 'die' but plural nouns tend to end 'en'
The woman (Die Frauen)

The woman is drinking (Die Frau trinkt)

CASE 2 - ACCUSATIVE aka is the direct object (has action done to)

The dog chased the woman (Der Hund verfolgte die Frau) the woman is accusative, the dog is nominative. If the woman chased the dog, the roles would be reversed and it'd be Die Frau verfolgte den Hund (i.e. the dog is now accusative, the woman nominative). This technically allows you to change the order of objects in a sentence, because the case change makes it obvious what is doing what to whom, whereas in English the order is what determines this.

CASE 3 - DATIVE aka is the indirect object (indirectly does an action or has one done to them)

The woman gives a bone to the dog (Die Frau gibt dem Hund einen Knochen). Now the woman is nominative, the bone is accusative (with the accusative version of 'a' for a masculine noun) and the dog is dative.

CASE 4 - GENETIVE aka has possession

The woman gives the boy's bone to the dog (Die Frau gibt dem Hund den Knochen des Jungen) Now the woman is nominative, the bone is accusative, the boy is genetive and the dog is dative.

As you can see, it's quite complicated (and I've probably made mistakes), but that's the gist of it.

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by False » Thu Jul 30, 2020 6:19 pm

thanks a lot!

what im getting from a lot of this is that it is important for written assessment but you could probably get away with being less than perfect in spoken conversation - people will just pick you up as an obvious non-native

im finding that im able to translate on the fly pretty well, able to think of the responses pretty well in broad strokes but fall apart in my genders etc

thanks again for the input

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Karl_ » Thu Jul 30, 2020 6:39 pm

Is your goal with German mostly practical, like being able to read and say keywords while on holiday, and get the gist of articles or TV shows?

I only ask as if you're mostly interested in learning vocabulary, you might prefer a German Anki deck to Duolingo. You can find an appropriate deck (word / phrase list) on AnkiWeb and then it's focused pure 100% on helping you memorise that deck.

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Ecno
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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Ecno » Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:56 pm

Ich lerne Deutsche mit dem Goethe Institut. Es ist ein bischen teuer aber sehr gut. Die Grammatik ist sehr schwer. Auf Englisch, finde ich, dass wir der Nomitaiv, Akusativ
etc nicht lernen.

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Curls » Sat Aug 01, 2020 8:10 pm

Oblomov Boblomov wrote:
RichardUK wrote:I speak pretty good German (although obviously when abroad it’s easier just to speak English but more spaced out and loudly, the locals love that approach ;) ) after falling in love with Bavaria after visiting Munich when I was a teenager, after that I spent a lot of time there and even purchased a house, I even did a dna test and found that I am British 89% and German 11% with ancestry if the same area (Bavaria) that I love so much so it was meant to be!

It must have been a confusing time for you when you beat part of yourself in two World Wars and one World Cup.



:slol:

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by Naomi Marazzamataz » Sat Aug 01, 2020 10:23 pm

I'm a little rusty but the articles in German are definitely confusing, don't worry. No German is going to judge you if you get the article wrong, it takes a lot of time to learn! If you're learning the basics, stick with the rule you know already of die for feminine, der for masculine and das for neutral. However, a little confusingly, sometimes there are words that don't follow this rule. Das Mädchen, for example - the girl.

There are actually general rules though for whether something will be masculine, feminine or neutral depending on the ending of the word. Obviously there are exceptions but it really helps!

der = words ending in -or, -ling, -smus or -ig
die = words ending in -ung, -keit, -schaft, –tät, -ik, -tion, -heit or -ei
das = chen, -ma, -um, -ment, -lein or -tum

There are other tricks and tips to know which one to use (types of words, if they are foreign words etc) and various websites with those rules to help guide you.

Where it gets very confusing though is that the articles change depending on whether it is nominative ,dative, genitive or accusative. That's honestly something to learn later down the line though. Stick to nominative and learn the basics of when to use der, die or das first and then you can learn how they change depending on the case (when den, dem and des get involved)

The whole thing makes you massively appreciate the most beautiful word in the English language: the
Wonderful, simple, never changing - the.

Das frau though? Never heard that used. That's not right for any of the cases so it could have been a mistake in the app. As I said, I'm pretty rusty though and I definitely need to brush up on my German.

Hope this helps.

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PostRe: any german speakers?
by False » Sat Aug 01, 2020 10:24 pm

thanks dudes

and Im just learning so I can speak and listen to german people and understand written german - survive in germany I suppose

and for fun

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