DIY thread...

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Green Gecko
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Green Gecko » Tue Nov 02, 2021 6:10 pm

My father has this in France but it's powered by essentially a wood burner or oven or something (must be pipes), but isn't electric about 5x the cost of gas so a bit impractical in the UK?

It does feel nice though. Presumably then you can get it plumbed in or you can get what are basically heatmatts like for lizards under the floorboards, I have no idea if you're aware of that. It's infrared heat.

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Dual
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Dual » Tue Nov 02, 2021 7:56 pm

Unless you're doing major refurbishment or building an extension I wouldn't bother.

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That's not a growth
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by That's not a growth » Tue Nov 09, 2021 10:33 am

I've still been thinking about heating for a while, and I've seen amazon have tado equipment on sale

https://www.amazon.co.uk/deal/be1c2f7a? ... _dt_sl6_a5

Does anyone use systems like these? I like the idea of being able to control each rooms temperature separately, but the idea of the thermostat being next the radiator seems idiotic to me - which I guess means more cost to get a separate thermostat in each room.

Any advice would be welcome.

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Dual
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Dual » Tue Nov 09, 2021 10:40 am

They're just wireless thermostatic radiator valves so I'm struggling to see what benefit there is. There's no extra control being offered over and above you bending down and adjusting the rad manually.

Have a look into Hive or similar which might be more what you think you're after and does provide some actual convenience.

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Mommy
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Mommy » Tue Nov 09, 2021 12:55 pm

That's not a growth wrote:I've still been thinking about heating for a while, and I've seen amazon have tado equipment on sale

https://www.amazon.co.uk/deal/be1c2f7a? ... _dt_sl6_a5

Does anyone use systems like these? I like the idea of being able to control each rooms temperature separately, but the idea of the thermostat being next the radiator seems idiotic to me - which I guess means more cost to get a separate thermostat in each room.

Any advice would be welcome.


What radiator valves have you got at the moment?
Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs) are the starting point for all radiators other than the one nearest your wall Thermostat.
How old is your boiler?

:dread:
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That's not a growth
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by That's not a growth » Tue Nov 09, 2021 1:05 pm

Dual wrote:They're just wireless thermostatic radiator valves so I'm struggling to see what benefit there is. There's no extra control being offered over and above you bending down and adjusting the rad manually.

Have a look into Hive or similar which might be more what you think you're after and does provide some actual convenience.


Thanks, guess it shows I need to research more as I thought they were very similar in terms of functionally on the surface. I'll have a deeper dive.

Mommy wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:I've still been thinking about heating for a while, and I've seen amazon have tado equipment on sale

https://www.amazon.co.uk/deal/be1c2f7a? ... _dt_sl6_a5

Does anyone use systems like these? I like the idea of being able to control each rooms temperature separately, but the idea of the thermostat being next the radiator seems idiotic to me - which I guess means more cost to get a separate thermostat in each room.

Any advice would be welcome.


What radiator valves have you got at the moment?
Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs) are the starting point for all radiators other than the one nearest your wall Thermostat.
How old is your boiler?


This is for a place I've not moved into yet, I'm just trying to get some research done ahead of time. But I'll most likely look to update my boiler as soon as I can after i move in. Anything I should be wary of?

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by BID0 » Tue Nov 09, 2021 1:08 pm

That's not a growth wrote:
darksideby182 wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:Anyone got underfloor heating? I'm trying to figure out if it's worth putting in to be used as an alternative to using radiators most of the time. I like the idea of the even coverage, but it's a lot of effort / money for something that might be only marginally better - and I need to look into running costs too.

I have installed the electrical system for work a few times, it's great for smaller areas and not too expensive to buy but can be expensive to run. For larger areas get a wet system.


Thanks for the info. Expensive to run is a concern, especially considering utility bills these days. Guess I'll just pass on it and save myself from the hassle.

I've got about half my house underfloor heated via electric mats now.

It's no more expensive than any other method of heating really, I'd go as far to say it's more effective as you get even heat distribution across the entire area rather than heating mostly a wall as a radiator would. You also find the heat stays lower with mats (a radiator heat goes up the wall, to the ceiling before heating the room top to bottom). Perhaps darksideby noticed bills were more expensive coming from a water system heated by gas rather than me who is in an electric only house, but with the rising price of gas and the fact that it will likely be phased out as a heated method at some point in the future, moving over to electric is a good idea at some point.

As has been said though, I'd save doing this job until you plan to replace your laminate flooring, tiles or carpets and do it all at once.

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by That's not a growth » Tue Nov 09, 2021 1:44 pm

BID0 wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:
darksideby182 wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:Anyone got underfloor heating? I'm trying to figure out if it's worth putting in to be used as an alternative to using radiators most of the time. I like the idea of the even coverage, but it's a lot of effort / money for something that might be only marginally better - and I need to look into running costs too.

I have installed the electrical system for work a few times, it's great for smaller areas and not too expensive to buy but can be expensive to run. For larger areas get a wet system.


Thanks for the info. Expensive to run is a concern, especially considering utility bills these days. Guess I'll just pass on it and save myself from the hassle.

I've got about half my house underfloor heated via electric mats now.

It's no more expensive than any other method of heating really, I'd go as far to say it's more effective as you get even heat distribution across the entire area rather than heating mostly a wall as a radiator would. You also find the heat stays lower with mats (a radiator heat goes up the wall, to the ceiling before heating the room top to bottom). Perhaps darksideby noticed bills were more expensive coming from a water system heated by gas rather than me who is in an electric only house, but with the rising price of gas and the fact that it will likely be phased out as a heated method at some point in the future, moving over to electric is a good idea at some point.

As has been said though, I'd save doing this job until you plan to replace your laminate flooring, tiles or carpets and do it all at once.


OK, that gives me something to think about. The idea of a more even heat distribution is very appealing to me if it turns out running costs wont be any more expensive.

Also, I would look to replace/update the flooring in the place I'm looking to move into, so doing all at once would be the plan - if I choose to do so.

Did you install yourself or get someone to do it?

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by BID0 » Tue Nov 09, 2021 2:24 pm

That's not a growth wrote:
BID0 wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:
darksideby182 wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:Anyone got underfloor heating? I'm trying to figure out if it's worth putting in to be used as an alternative to using radiators most of the time. I like the idea of the even coverage, but it's a lot of effort / money for something that might be only marginally better - and I need to look into running costs too.

I have installed the electrical system for work a few times, it's great for smaller areas and not too expensive to buy but can be expensive to run. For larger areas get a wet system.


Thanks for the info. Expensive to run is a concern, especially considering utility bills these days. Guess I'll just pass on it and save myself from the hassle.

I've got about half my house underfloor heated via electric mats now.

It's no more expensive than any other method of heating really, I'd go as far to say it's more effective as you get even heat distribution across the entire area rather than heating mostly a wall as a radiator would. You also find the heat stays lower with mats (a radiator heat goes up the wall, to the ceiling before heating the room top to bottom). Perhaps darksideby noticed bills were more expensive coming from a water system heated by gas rather than me who is in an electric only house, but with the rising price of gas and the fact that it will likely be phased out as a heated method at some point in the future, moving over to electric is a good idea at some point.

As has been said though, I'd save doing this job until you plan to replace your laminate flooring, tiles or carpets and do it all at once.


OK, that gives me something to think about. The idea of a more even heat distribution is very appealing to me if it turns out running costs wont be any more expensive.

Also, I would look to replace/update the flooring in the place I'm looking to move into, so doing all at once would be the plan - if I choose to do so.

Did you install yourself or get someone to do it?

I have installed the underfloor mat in a bedroom after I had finished decorating it, so it's not impossible. Just make sure you number your flooring if you are using engineered or laminate planks so you can put it all back in the right order.

I did it all myself. 1 bathroom floor that I tiled over and the rest have been a combination of either laminate or engineered wood.

If you can wire a plug then you shouldn't have any problem installing them yourself. There are plenty of videos on YouTube if you wanted to see what's involved beforehand and just @ me here if you get stuck!

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Zerudaaaaa!
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Zerudaaaaa! » Tue Nov 09, 2021 2:33 pm

Does putting together Ikea furniture count as DIY? Personally, I think it does. In which case I've done a fair bit of DIY, making me officially a "manly man".

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Mommy » Tue Nov 09, 2021 4:24 pm

Zerudaaaaa! wrote:Does putting together Ikea furniture count as DIY? Personally, I think it does. In which case I've done a fair bit of DIY, making me officially a "manly man".


I'd agree that it does. :D

:dread:
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Mommy » Tue Nov 09, 2021 4:25 pm

That's not a growth wrote:
Dual wrote:They're just wireless thermostatic radiator valves so I'm struggling to see what benefit there is. There's no extra control being offered over and above you bending down and adjusting the rad manually.

Have a look into Hive or similar which might be more what you think you're after and does provide some actual convenience.


Thanks, guess it shows I need to research more as I thought they were very similar in terms of functionally on the surface. I'll have a deeper dive.

Mommy wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:I've still been thinking about heating for a while, and I've seen amazon have tado equipment on sale

https://www.amazon.co.uk/deal/be1c2f7a? ... _dt_sl6_a5

Does anyone use systems like these? I like the idea of being able to control each rooms temperature separately, but the idea of the thermostat being next the radiator seems idiotic to me - which I guess means more cost to get a separate thermostat in each room.

Any advice would be welcome.


What radiator valves have you got at the moment?
Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs) are the starting point for all radiators other than the one nearest your wall Thermostat.
How old is your boiler?


This is for a place I've not moved into yet, I'm just trying to get some research done ahead of time. But I'll most likely look to update my boiler as soon as I can after i move in. Anything I should be wary of?

Just take some pics of the boiler, the valves on the radiator, smoke detectors and fusebox and post them on here.
It'll gives us a starting point.

:dread:
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Squinty
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Squinty » Wed Nov 10, 2021 8:21 am

Zerudaaaaa! wrote:Does putting together Ikea furniture count as DIY? Personally, I think it does. In which case I've done a fair bit of DIY, making me officially a "manly man".


I think of it as wood Lego.

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Green Gecko » Wed Nov 10, 2021 11:31 am

Doing IKEA is bad DIY done well. It doesn't really teach you anything besides bearing out frustration, and if you manage not to crush yourself or something (or someone else), some understanding of load bearing and fixings and stuff like that. But it's hardly carpentry. It's a great start.

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Errkal » Sun Nov 21, 2021 1:05 pm

Sorted the floor on the porch. Was my learning floor before I do the living room, hall and conservatory at some point. Has turned out alright, need to finish the edging at some point but yeah all good.

Image

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by That's not a growth » Sun Nov 21, 2021 2:42 pm

Looking good. Any pointers for someone looking to do some floors in future?

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Errkal » Sun Nov 21, 2021 2:53 pm

That's not a growth wrote:Looking good. Any pointers for someone looking to do some floors in future?


Do some practice of joining boards they can be fiddly little pricks so getting the nack is important,
Get the right tools the rubber hammer and bent metal bashy thing is essential.
Pre-plan for what will need cutting as it would be so easy to waste tonnes of planks by not being clever with some of the cuts.
Get a good jig saw, if you go laminate they can chip so have to be a bit careful.

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Green Gecko » Sun Nov 21, 2021 8:48 pm

Always run a jigsaw through the top of a lamenate panel, not the other way around, and taping the cut can help. Use a blade specifically for laminate or plywood and faster is better. Let the tool do the work.

I have the Bosch PST 800 PEL which always seems to go on sale on Amazon around this time of year, that comes with a cutting guide that actually works.

Don't even both cutting a thin board without clamping it down, Irwin Quick Grips are great for that as you can use them anywhere.

Thor do a fantastic double faced rubber and nylon mallet which is indispensable for bashing gooseberry fool together (and great for driving chisels).

You could also use those small circular saws you grip with one hand as really that is a lot better than any kind of reciprocating saw.

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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Dowbocop » Sun Nov 21, 2021 9:41 pm

Errkal wrote:
That's not a growth wrote:Looking good. Any pointers for someone looking to do some floors in future?


Do some practice of joining boards they can be fiddly little pricks so getting the nack is important,
Get the right tools the rubber hammer and bent metal bashy thing is essential.
Pre-plan for what will need cutting as it would be so easy to waste tonnes of planks by not being clever with some of the cuts.
Get a good jig saw, if you go laminate they can chip so have to be a bit careful.

Apologies in advance if I've underestimated your DIY experience TNAG. I'll also caveat that next week John Lewis are coming to fit our new laminate flooring so I'm taking the cowardly route personally!

If you haven't used a jigsaw (or whatever tool you choose) before then maybe try and grab some offcuts of laminate or plywood from the front of a B&Q (you make a donation to Shelter in exchange) so you can get used to how the jigsaw works and practice going in a straight line. I have one on indefinite loan from my wife's dad (read: I borrowed it in 2016 and haven't given it back yet :slol:) and my first cuts were rough! Definitely use a sawhorse or workbench and clamp like a robot gangster. Jigsaws cut on the upward stroke so make sure you're used to that as it might be different to saws you've used before (as GG says you may wish to tape the cut to reduce splintering).

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Errkal
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PostRe: DIY thread...
by Errkal » Sun Nov 21, 2021 10:03 pm

You can get saw blades that cut downwards which solve the upward thing.

Following a line does take some getting used to, thankfully it was until the last row of boards I needed to do any long whole length of board cuts at which point I had a far amount of practice.

I did use a workbench to clamp things, strawberry float doing this gooseberry fool without something holding the plank straight and still


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