Politics Thread 6

Fed up talking videogames? Why?

Who will you vote for at the next General Election?

Conservative
10
11%
Labour
30
33%
Liberal Democrat
24
26%
Green
18
20%
SNP
6
7%
Brexit Party
0
No votes
UKIP
1
1%
Plaid Cymru
0
No votes
DUP
0
No votes
Sinn Fein
2
2%
The Independent Group for Change
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 91
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Moggy
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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Moggy » Tue Dec 31, 2019 11:50 am

Samuel_1 wrote:
Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Samuel_1 wrote:I don't think that is her message, but acknowledging that they need to win back lost seats is just being practical. I really don't think you should let the word patriotism dictate your opinion of her going forward, we'll all have to see what each candidate proposes. As I said, there are no other examples of xenophobic rhetoric in her "guff" even if one was to concede that the use word "patriotism" is abhorrent.


Of course that was her message. Why else appeal to those that think patriotism is important? She’s directly aiming that at the racist/xenophobic elements of the working class. But she’s also completely unaware that those people are never likely to vote Labour again anyway.

Her message is “we need to win back lost seats”? Wow, that’s some deep political thinking there, why has nobody else ever thought of that?

Not deep at all, I didn't suggest it was. Do you think that everyone that says they're patriotic is a xenophobe? I think if I lived in NZ I'd feel pretty patriotic with the current government in place.


Where did I suggest you said it was deep? I was explaining why it was meaningless guff.

Patriotism inevitably ends up with people thinking their country is better than all of the others. Not every patriot is a xenophobe, but every xenophobe is a “patriot”.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by KK » Tue Dec 31, 2019 12:02 pm

Wage increases coming in 2020:

BBC News wrote:The national living wage is to rise by 6.2% in what the government says is "the biggest cash increase ever".

The rise is more than four times the rate of inflation and takes hourly pay for people over 25 to £8.72 from April.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: "For too long, people haven't seen the pay rises they deserve."

But businesses warned that a sharp increase in wages would put pressure on companies and urged the government to reduce costs elsewhere for firms.

Hannah Essex, co-executive director of the British Chambers of Commerce, said that many companies "have struggled with increased costs in a time of great economic uncertainty".

"Raising wage floors so far above the rate of inflation will pile further pressure on cash flow and eat into training and investment budgets," she said.

"For this policy to be sustainable, government must offset these costs by reducing others."

From April 2020, the new rates are:

  • The National Living Wage for ages 25 and above - up 6.2% to £8.72
  • The National Minimum Wage for 21 to 24-year-olds - up 6.5% to £8.20
  • For 18 to 20-year-olds - up 4.9% to £6.45
  • For under-18s - up 4.6% to £4.55
  • For apprentices - up 6.4% to £4.15
An independent report published this year said there has been little or no evidence of job losses as a result of rising minimum wage levels, which are currently set at £8.21 for people aged 25 and over and £7.70 for 21 to 24-year-olds.

Professor Arindrajit Dube, an academic in the US and an expert on the subject, said there was "room for exploring a more ambitious national living wage" in the UK in the coming years.

He stressed, however, that because there is relatively little evidence available, the independent Low Pay Commission should be able to review the effect on jobs as pay increased.

Business rates

But the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) said "an increase of this magnitude" means firms may recruit fewer people, cancel investment plans or consider redundancies.

"There's always a danger of being self-defeating in this space," said Craig Beaumont, FSB director of external affairs and advocacy.

"Wage increases aren't much good to workers if prices rise, jobs are lost and there's no impact on productivity because employers are forced to cut back on investing in tech, training and equipment."

He said that small firms will need support, especially as there will be a 1.7% increase in business rates in April next year.

The government also said it will press ahead with recommendations by the Low Pay Commission to allow workers over 21 to receive the national living wage by 2024 when it is set to reach £10.50 an hour.

Labour has called for a £10-an-hour minimum wage and said the government had not gone far enough to help those on the lowest pay.

"This announcement falls short on what is needed to help workers and comes against a backdrop of an economy created by Conservative governments over the past decade that has left millions of people trapped in low paid, insecure work and underpayment of the minimum wage on the rise," said shadow work and pensions secretary Margaret Greenwood.

Frances O'Grady, general secretary of the Trades Union Congress, said workers needed a national living wage of more than £10 "now, not in four years' time".

"This is a long-planned raise, but it's also long overdue. Workers are still not getting a fair share of the wealth they create. And in-work poverty is soaring as millions of families struggle to make ends meet," she said.

The Resolution Foundation, a think tank which focuses on the living standards of low and middle-income people, welcomed the plan but its economic analyst, Nye Cominetti, said it was "not risk-free" in terms of inflation.

He said: "It should be matched by a renewed commitment to swiftly evaluating evidence of the impact of such large and sustained minimum wage rises and acting on that evidence if problems emerge."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-50947097

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Rocsteady » Tue Dec 31, 2019 12:05 pm

Good.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Dual » Tue Dec 31, 2019 12:20 pm

Wasn't it meant to be £10?

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Moggy
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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Moggy » Tue Dec 31, 2019 12:24 pm

Dual wrote:Wasn't it meant to be £10?


£10.50 an hour according to page 16 of their manifesto.

https://assets-global.website-files.com ... ifesto.pdf

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Tomous
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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Tomous » Tue Dec 31, 2019 12:25 pm

They shouldn’t be allowed to call it the National Living Wage until it is in fact, a living wage.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Ecno » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:10 pm

Merry Christmous Everyone wrote:They shouldn’t be allowed to call it the National Living Wage until it is in fact, a living wage.


It's a living wage in Bangalore* #globalbritain

*maybe, living costs in Indian cities are quite high.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by OrangeRKN » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:12 pm

Merry Christmous Everyone wrote:They shouldn’t be allowed to call it the National Living Wage until it is in fact, a living wage.


It was genius and despicable rebranding

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Lagamorph
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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Lagamorph » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:45 pm

Is raising the "National Living Wage" actually any good though if people can still pay less than it with the National Minimum Wage? Why are there two separate ones?

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Tomous » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:48 pm

Lagamorph wrote:Is raising the "National Living Wage" actually any good though if people can still pay less than it with the National Minimum Wage? Why are there two separate ones?


They rebranded the National Minimum Wage to the National Living Wage for people over 25. It’s the same thing.

They thought this was a good way of combatting calls to raise the Minimum Wage to the actual Living Wage rather than you know, actually raising it. And unfortunately, it worked.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Lex-Man » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:49 pm

It's quite a good tactic because they can chalk it up as a promise fulfilled and then kick all critism into a quagmire of vauge definitions.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Moggy » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:51 pm

Lex-Man wrote:It's quite a good tactic because they can chalk it up as a promise fulfilled and then kick all critism into a quagmire of vauge definitions.


Except their manifesto pegged it at £10.50 an hour.

Not that they will ever be held to account for it.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Vermilion » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:53 pm

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:Image


Image

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Winckle » Tue Dec 31, 2019 1:54 pm

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:
Lex-Man wrote:It's quite a good tactic because they can chalk it up as a promise fulfilled and then kick all critism into a quagmire of vauge definitions.


Except their manifesto pegged it at £10.50 an hour.

Not that they will ever be held to account for it.

By 2024 wasn't it?

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Lex-Man » Tue Dec 31, 2019 7:39 pm

https://www.thenational.scot/news/18123 ... hOms2uBu6I

NEWLY elected Prime Minister Boris Johnson has passed an EU Withdrawal Bill through a now compliant Westminster Parliament. He claims it proves he is “getting Brexit done” with his “oven-ready” agreement. However, having stripped out key components of the agreement he reached with the EU in November (and campaigned on in the recent Westminster election), that agreement is not the one they signed up to. He has, in effect, re-opened negotiations with the EU with absolutely no guarantee they will simply wave through the changes he wants in his crusade to turn the UK into a European sweatshop.



This is going to be interesting, if true.

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Moggy
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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Moggy » Wed Jan 01, 2020 9:40 pm



A big well done to Corbyn and Swinson for ignoring the warnings and being brave enough to cave in to the exact thing Boris Johnson wanted. A bloody good job not working together after caving in to Johnson as well.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Lex-Man » Wed Jan 01, 2020 10:16 pm

Partridge Iciclebubbles wrote:

A big well done to Corbyn and Swinson for ignoring the warnings and being brave enough to cave in to the exact thing Boris Johnson wanted. A bloody good job not working together after caving in to Johnson as well.


The biggest worry is that they do the same thing again.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Hexx » Tue Jan 07, 2020 12:45 pm

Can anyone explain to my why Lab's leader elections take so long?

I mean it's like 3 times as long as the GE period

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Winckle » Tue Jan 07, 2020 1:27 pm

Hexx wrote:Can anyone explain to my why Lab's leader elections take so long?

I mean it's like 3 times as long as the GE period

It's a democratic process involving multiple stages, CLP meetings, and then finally the actual vote.

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PostRe: Politics Thread 6
by Squinty » Tue Jan 07, 2020 1:29 pm

Lex-Man wrote:https://www.thenational.scot/news/18123731.pm-stripped-key-parts-deal-agreed-eu/?ref=fbshr&fbclid=IwAR1NZzdYZ15Ni76LWfeyWUZRNiphL5GPo2W4H0IvsHq2h3-32hOms2uBu6I

NEWLY elected Prime Minister Boris Johnson has passed an EU Withdrawal Bill through a now compliant Westminster Parliament. He claims it proves he is “getting Brexit done” with his “oven-ready” agreement. However, having stripped out key components of the agreement he reached with the EU in November (and campaigned on in the recent Westminster election), that agreement is not the one they signed up to. He has, in effect, re-opened negotiations with the EU with absolutely no guarantee they will simply wave through the changes he wants in his crusade to turn the UK into a European sweatshop.



This is going to be interesting, if true.


What the strawberry floating hell is he doing?


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