The Literature Thread

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deathofcows
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by deathofcows » Mon Aug 06, 2018 11:59 am

Recently finished The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet.

Ordered the second straight afterwards. Really enjoyed this first chapter in the (recently completed?) sci-fi trilogy. Was humane, warm and interesting throughout with characters I genuinely cared about by the end. Not much actual drama but a lot of space opera character development for your buck and very, very readable. :D

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Errkal
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Errkal » Sun Aug 19, 2018 12:29 pm

Am enjoying the Expanse books, am about half way through book 2.

Ive watched season 1 and 2 so it s a bit odd as I know the story but very enjoyable.

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Rex Kramer » Sat Sep 01, 2018 7:30 am

Rex Kramer wrote:And Perdido Street Station is finished and what an utterly fabulous book it was. I can't recommend it highly enough if you like fantasy, steampunk or even sci-fi. Going to take a break from the series before picking up The Scar in the summer.

Picked up The Scar before going on holiday and it's even better than Perdido Street Station. I can't recommend this book enough, it's probably one of the best things I've ever read. The author has either toned down the over long descriptive text or what he's describing is so much more interesting. The story though is just incredible. I'm about 30% through and the connections to the first book are very slight, you could probably read this without the first though you'd miss some of the world building. The main location of the 2nd book would make the best RPG gameworld you have ever played, guaranteed.

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Alvin Flummux
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Alvin Flummux » Sun Sep 02, 2018 7:08 pm

deathofcows wrote:Recently finished The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet.

Ordered the second straight afterwards. Really enjoyed this first chapter in the (recently completed?) sci-fi trilogy. Was humane, warm and interesting throughout with characters I genuinely cared about by the end. Not much actual drama but a lot of space opera character development for your buck and very, very readable. :D


Sounds interesting! Will have to give that a look.

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Rex Kramer » Sat Sep 22, 2018 6:41 pm

80% into The Scar now and it's quite possible it could be the best thing I've ever read. Anyone else read it?

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Poser
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Poser » Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:18 am

On the strength of the number of adaptations now out there, I decided to start reading the Tom Clancy/Jack Ryan books in order.

The first is Hunt for Red October and I'm really struggling with it. Can anyone confirm whether later Jack Ryan books lighten up at all? It's like reading someone describe a game of chess, positioning pieces across the Atlantic.

I need to know whether to persevere or not.

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Tafdolphin
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Tafdolphin » Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:25 am

Poser wrote:On the strength of the number of adaptations now out there, I decided to start reading the Tom Clancy/Jack Ryan books in order.

The first is Hunt for Red October and I'm really struggling with it. Can anyone confirm whether later Jack Ryan books lighten up at all? It's like reading someone describe a game of chess, positioning pieces across the Atlantic.

I need to know whether to persevere or not.


As far as I can remember, (it's been a while) HftRO is particularly full of military terms and tactics. It's like reading a strawberry floating Jane's manual sometimes. The later Ryan books get more intrigue and less technical I think.

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Poser
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Poser » Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:29 am

Tafdolphin wrote:
Poser wrote:On the strength of the number of adaptations now out there, I decided to start reading the Tom Clancy/Jack Ryan books in order.

The first is Hunt for Red October and I'm really struggling with it. Can anyone confirm whether later Jack Ryan books lighten up at all? It's like reading someone describe a game of chess, positioning pieces across the Atlantic.

I need to know whether to persevere or not.


As far as I can remember, (it's been a while) HftRO is particularly full of military terms and tactics. It's like reading a strawberry floating Jane's manual sometimes. The later Ryan books get more intrigue and less technical I think.


Great stuff, thanks, that's what I was hoping to hear. Honestly, it's so intricate with the minutiae of both tactical movements and alsoi the technical aspects of operating a nuclear sub. I've found it really heavy going. In fact, I've stopped reading it and started watching films on my commute. :slol:

I'll finish it, though, and move on the the next ones.

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TV Dinner
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by TV Dinner » Fri Feb 01, 2019 3:39 pm

I'm in the mood for some Lovecraftesque books. Has anyone got any good in-print recommendations?

Nothing by Lovecraft himself, I'm well covered there.

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Rex Kramer
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Rex Kramer » Fri Feb 01, 2019 4:17 pm

TV Dinner wrote:I'm in the mood for some gLovecraftesque books. Has anyone got any good in-print recommendations?

Nothing by Lovecraft himself, I'm well covered there.

Have a look at Perdido Street Station. It's not exactly Lovecraftian but its a very interesting mix of fantasy and horror.

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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by BAKA » Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:27 pm

There are a load of Witcher books on Amazon for 99p today.

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SugarDave
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by SugarDave » Fri Feb 15, 2019 2:38 pm

Recently went through The Iliad and it might have been one of the most unintentionally funny books I've ever read. The catalyst for most of the story being Achilles throwing a paddy to his mother, the soap opera tier squabbles of the Greek pantheon of gods, Menolaus getting road rage in a chariot race, and everyone being described as having tears streaming down their face at the slightest obstacle they face, it's hilarious. :lol:

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Errkal
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Errkal » Tue Apr 16, 2019 8:35 pm

Reading a book called John Dies at the End, it’s very odd but very fun.

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SugarDave
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by SugarDave » Sat Jun 15, 2019 9:46 pm

I'm wanting to finally read Crime and Punishment as well as The Brothers Karamazov but I'm struggling to find a consensus on which translation to go with. I have the Constance Garnett ones on my Kindle already but I'd rather pick up another version if there's a better option. Would anyone here happen to have a recommendation?

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Curls
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Curls » Sat Jun 15, 2019 10:15 pm

Is 'Prisoners of Geography' worth a crack?

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Errkal
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Errkal » Sun Jun 16, 2019 8:03 am

Errkal wrote:Reading a book called John Dies at the End, it’s very odd but very fun.


Gave up on this in the end, it just got more and more daft to the point it felt like it was trying to odd rather the story just went that way.

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Moggy
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Moggy » Sun Jun 16, 2019 8:26 am

Errkal wrote:
Errkal wrote:Reading a book called John Dies at the End, it’s very odd but very fun.


Gave up on this in the end, it just got more and more daft to the point it felt like it was trying to odd rather the story just went that way.


I think they made a film out of it but I haven't seen it so have no idea if it is any good.

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Errkal
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Errkal » Sun Jun 16, 2019 8:33 am

Moggy wrote:
Errkal wrote:
Errkal wrote:Reading a book called John Dies at the End, it’s very odd but very fun.


Gave up on this in the end, it just got more and more daft to the point it felt like it was trying to odd rather the story just went that way.


I think they made a film out of it but I haven't seen it so have no idea if it is any good.


Yeah a mate of mine mentioned it, apparently it was alright. I imagine in a film it works well, but yeah for me it just got too stupid.

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BTB
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by BTB » Tue Jun 18, 2019 1:41 pm

Curls wrote:Is 'Prisoners of Geography' worth a crack?

I read it and found it fascinating, explains some very complex situations very well.

If you're interested in geo-politics/international relations then I'd definitely suggest it.

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Preezy
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PostRe: The Literature Thread
by Preezy » Fri Jul 05, 2019 12:40 pm

Right, literary buffs of the forum... assemble!

I'm trying to find out the name of this short story (I thought it was by Stephen King but apparently not) about these people that go into a cornfield, get lost and find a dying dog, and they slowly go mad and there's this big sacrificial stone and they basically kill each other. The story ends with some other people walking past the cornfield and hearing someone call for help, and the cycle begins again.

Any ideas?


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