The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)

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Errkal
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Errkal » Thu Nov 29, 2018 8:25 am

Preezy wrote:Convinced those random shops are money-laundering fronts for the mob. They can't possibly make enough money to pay the rent, their suppliers and their staff.

We seem to have a fair few convenience type stores pop.up sometimes next to each other that I think the same about.

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That's not a growth
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by That's not a growth » Thu Nov 29, 2018 8:36 am

You'd be surprised the footfall and turn over even small convenience shops have. It seems to be quite common for them to be family run, and for them to basically spend their waking life in the shop (I been in plenty where there's a TV with Corrie on) and to do very long hours. It'd be a tough way to make a living, but I don't doubt it's a way to make one.

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Gemini73
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Gemini73 » Wed Dec 26, 2018 7:57 pm

Watching the news this evening it would seem that Britain's high streets suffered its worst Boxing Day sale slump in years. Adding to that the average spend on the high street over the Christmas period was less than previous years. While that may not come as a surprise to anyone here what amazed me was retailers absolute stubbornness in their belief that everything bar their refusal to adapt and change was to blame. They just outright refuse to accept that a lot has changed in the last ten years or so and think that simply chucking up a 50% off sales poster in the store window is enough to entice people into town. Clearly not.

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Rocsteady
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Rocsteady » Wed Dec 26, 2018 11:08 pm

Went into town, strawberry float all was there, went back home and ordered clothing online.

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floydfreak
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by floydfreak » Wed Dec 26, 2018 11:21 pm

That's not a growth wrote:You'd be surprised the footfall and turn over even small convenience shops have. It seems to be quite common for them to be family run, and for them to basically spend their waking life in the shop (I been in plenty where there's a TV with Corrie on) and to do very long hours. It'd be a tough way to make a living, but I don't doubt it's a way to make one.


I have a corner shop top of my road when i leave my house at 6.30am to get to work for 7am they are opening up at 6.30.

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Vermilion
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Vermilion » Thu Dec 27, 2018 7:49 am

Around here it was impossible to get to any of the main high streets anyways, the trains weren't even running (engineering works).

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Moggy
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Moggy » Thu Dec 27, 2018 8:27 am

Just the thought of the crowds on Boxing Day has always put me off of going to the sales.

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Ad7
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Ad7 » Thu Dec 27, 2018 8:44 am

Who the hell wants to go shopping on boxing day? Also, in the age of internet shopping why bother at all? It's not like the excuse of Christmas atmosphere still applies.

Oh it was wonderful, so christmassy, eczema riddled families showing off their new Superdry hoodies while beating the crowds back for interest free credit and £100 off a L shaped sofa.

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Gemini73
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Gemini73 » Thu Dec 27, 2018 10:12 am

Retailers just can't accept times have moved on. Sure folk might nip into town to buy bits and pieces before meeting with friends for a coffee and a natter, (Waterstones have it right in that respect), but the days of lumbering around town for hours on end, weighed down with bags and bags of shopping are over.

Consumers want a more relaxed shopping experience, not a store crammed with people and racks upon racks of items that they can order online from the comfort of their home and at half the price.

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Oblomov Boblomov
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Oblomov Boblomov » Thu Dec 27, 2018 10:54 am

Boxing Day: should I soothe my mild hangover in the company of family and friends, from the comfort of my own home, playing Nintendo, watching films and picking at leftovers — or should I venture onto the high street to dance the retail tango with the general public?

It's a tricky one, to be sure.

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Bunni
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Bunni » Thu Dec 27, 2018 11:16 am

If shopping centres want to stay open they could do with installing lockers for stuff. I hate being weighed down by bags making it difficult to continue looking. If I could dump my stuff half way I’d spend more.

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rinks
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by rinks » Thu Dec 27, 2018 12:29 pm

Bunni wrote:If shopping centres want to stay open they could do with installing lockers for stuff. I hate being weighed down by bags making it difficult to continue looking. If I could dump my stuff half way I’d spend more.

It's a good idea, but at least they have large areas set aside where you can put your own portable locker.

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Lex-Man
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Lex-Man » Thu Dec 27, 2018 1:19 pm

rinks wrote:
Bunni wrote:If shopping centres want to stay open they could do with installing lockers for stuff. I hate being weighed down by bags making it difficult to continue looking. If I could dump my stuff half way I’d spend more.

It's a good idea, but at least they have large areas set aside where you can put your own portable locker.


They do it in Japan. You can always find a locker over there.

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KK
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by KK » Thu Dec 27, 2018 1:36 pm

Bunni wrote:If shopping centres want to stay open they could do with installing lockers for stuff. I hate being weighed down by bags making it difficult to continue looking. If I could dump my stuff half way I’d spend more.

Even supermarkets with cafes do this. You lock your trolley away and go have something to eat. Seems silly that something like this hasn't been incorporated elsewhere. Then again maybe places like Westfield have and I've just never looked/asked.

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Sandy
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Sandy » Thu Dec 27, 2018 1:48 pm

I walked into the next town along from where I live on boxing mainly just to get out the house and away from people and it was completely dead. Can definitely see 2018 being the death of many more chain stores. I'm more than happy with that though, it opens the path for smaller indy stores to actually be able to compete.

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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Vermilion » Thu Dec 27, 2018 1:52 pm

Snowy wrote:Can definitely see 2018 being the death of many more chain stores. I'm more than happy with that though, it opens the path for smaller indy stores to actually be able to compete.


In my area, if a chain store closes, no independents arrive to take their place, only coffee houses, & charity shops fill the void.

Just another reason why i go to the cities as and when i can.

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Winckle
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Winckle » Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:29 am

https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... nistration

HMV goes into administration for second time in six years

HMV is on the brink of collapse for the second time in six years, putting 2,200 jobs at risk.

The music retailer has appointed administrators at KPMG following weak sales over the crucial Christmas trading period.

HMV confirmed its 125 stores across the UK will remain open while talks with suppliers and potential buyers continue.

The 97-year-old retailer was rescued by Hilco, the restructuring specialist, when it previously collapsed into administration in 2013.

Paul McGowan, executive chairman of HMV and Hilco said on Friday said the decline in the UK CD and DVD market had made the situation “unsustainable”.

“During the key Christmas trading period the market for DVD fell by over 30% compared to the previous year and, whilst HMV performed considerably better than that, such a deterioration in a key sector of the market is unsustainable.

“HMV has clearly not been insulated from the general malaise of the UK High Street and has suffered the same challenges with Business Rates and other government-centric policies which have led to increased fixed costs in the business.

“Business rates alone represent an annual cost to HMV in excess of £15m. Even an exceptionally well-run and much-loved business such as HMV cannot withstand the tsunami of challenges facing UK retailers over the last 12 months on top of such a dramatic change in consumer behaviour in the entertainment market.

Its latest troubles are a sign of the challenges facing music retailers during a rapidly changing time for the industry. HMV is also suffering from the wider malaise on UK high streets, as shoppers uncertain about the impact of Brexit rein in spending.


Sounds like even the weird "VHS" Blu Ray editions designed to appeal to physical media fetishists couldn't save them.

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Ad7
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Ad7 » Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:33 am

More like HIV amirite

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KK
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by KK » Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:36 am

I’m having a delivery from them today. They’re great for 2 for £30 on 4K Blu Rays. Die Hard was also just £9.99 the other day.

It’ll be a shame if they leave the high street because they pretty much are the last psychical media outlet left aside from GAME and supermarkets. My nearest John Lewis has dumped their disc based offerings (can only order online for collection) and Curry’s have a token gesture (would rather sell you the console).

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Frank
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PostRe: The Retail Apocalypse (Incorporating Casual Dining Closures)
by Frank » Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:39 am

Their high street stores have been overrun with cheap tat (KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON mugs, etc) and Funko Pops for ages though. Absolutely miniscule gaming section (top 10 or jog on), too.

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